worm


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WORM

abbr.
Computers write once, read many

worm

 (wûrm)
n.
1. Any of various invertebrates, especially an annelid, flatworm, nematode, or nemertean, having a long, flexible, rounded or flattened body, often without obvious appendages.
2. Any of various crawling insect larvae, such as a grub or a caterpillar, having a soft elongated body.
3. Any of various other animals, such as a shipworm or a slowworm, having a long slender limbless body.
4.
a. Something, such as the thread of a screw or the spiral condenser in a still, that resembles a worm in form or appearance.
b. The spirally threaded shaft of a worm gear.
5. An insidiously tormenting or devouring force: "felt the black worm of treachery growing in his heart" (Mario Puzo).
6. A person regarded as pitiable or contemptible.
7. worms Medicine Infestation of the intestines or other parts of the body with parasitic worms; helminthiasis.
8. Computers A malicious program that replicates itself until it fills all of the storage space on a drive or network.
v. wormed, worm·ing, worms
v.tr.
1. To make (one's way) with the sinuous crawling motion of a worm.
2. To work (one's way or oneself) subtly or gradually; insinuate: She wormed her way into his confidence.
3. To elicit by artful or devious means. Usually used with out of: wormed a confession out of the suspect.
4. To cure of intestinal worms: wormed the dog.
5. Nautical To wrap yarn or twine spirally around (rope).
v.intr.
1. To move in a manner suggestive of a worm.
2. To make one's way by artful or devious means: He can't worm out of this situation.

[Middle English, from Old English wurm, variant of wyrm; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

worm

(wɜːm)
n
1. (Animals) any of various invertebrates, esp the annelids (earthworms, etc), nematodes (roundworms), and flatworms, having a slender elongated body.
2. (Animals) any of various insect larvae having an elongated body, such as the silkworm and wireworm
3. (Animals) any of various unrelated animals that resemble annelids, nematodes, etc, such as the glow-worm and shipworm
4. a gnawing or insinuating force or agent that torments or slowly eats away
5. a wretched or spineless person
6. anything that resembles a worm in appearance or movement
7. (Tools) a shaft on which a helical groove has been cut, as in a gear arrangement in which such a shaft meshes with a toothed wheel
8. (Brewing) a spiral pipe cooled by air or flowing water, used as a condenser in a still
9. (Zoology) a nontechnical name for lytta
10. (Anatomy) anatomy any wormlike organ, structure, or part, such as the middle lobe of the cerebellum (vermis cerebelli). Technical name: vermis
11. (Computer Science) computing a program that duplicates itself many times in a network and prevents its destruction. It often carries a logic bomb or virus
vb
12. to move, act, or cause to move or act with the slow sinuous movement of a worm
13. (foll by: in, into, out of, etc) to make (one's way) slowly and stealthily; insinuate (oneself)
14. (tr; often foll by out of or from) to extract (information, a secret, etc) from by persistent questioning
15. (tr) to free from or purge of worms
16. (Nautical Terms) (tr) nautical to wind yarn around (a rope) so as to fill the spaces between the strands and render the surface smooth for parcelling and serving
[Old English wyrm; related to Old Frisian wirm, Old High German wurm, Old Norse ormr, Gothic waurms, Latin vermis, Greek romos woodworm]
ˈwormer n
ˈwormˌlike, ˈwormish adj

WORM

(wɜːm)
n acronym for
(Computer Science) write once read many times: an optical disk that enables users to store data but not change it

worm

(wɜrm)
n.
1. any of numerous long, slender, soft-bodied, legless, bilaterally symmetrical invertebrates, including the roundworms, platyhelminths, acanthocephalans, nemerteans, horsehair worms, and annelids.
2. (loosely) any of numerous small creeping animals with more or less slender, elongated bodies, and without limbs or with very short ones.
3. something resembling or suggesting a worm in appearance, movement, etc.
4. a groveling, abject, or contemptible person.
5. the thread of a screw.
6. a rotating cylinder or shaft, cut with one or more helical threads, that engages with and drives a worm gear.
7. something that penetrates, injures, or consumes slowly or insidiously.
8. worms, (used with a sing. v.) any disease or disorder arising from the presence of parasitic worms in the intestines or other tissues; helminthiasis.
9. the lytta of a dog or other carnivorous animal.
10. computer code planted illegally in a software program so as to destroy data in any system that downloads the program, as by reformatting the hard disk.
v.i.
11. to move or act like a worm; creep, crawl, or advance slowly, stealthily, or insidiously.
v.t.
12. to cause to move in a devious or stealthy manner: a thief worming his hand into a coat pocket.
13. to get by persistent, insidious efforts (usu. fol. by out or from): to worm a secret out of someone.
14. to insinuate (oneself or one's way) into another's favor, confidence, etc.: He wormed his way into the king's favor.
15. to free from worms: to worm puppies.
16. Naut. to wind yarn or the like spirally round (a rope) so as to fill the spaces between the strands and render the surface smooth.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English wyrm dragon, serpent, worm, c. Old Saxon, Old High German wurm, Old Norse ormr, Gothic waurms; akin to Latin vermis]
worm′er, n.

WORM

(würm)
n.
write once, read many (times): a technology that allows data to be written onto an optical disc only once.

worm

(wûrm)
1. Any of various invertebrate animals having a soft, long body that is round or flattened and usually lacks limbs.
2. Computer Science A destructive computer program that copies itself over and over until it fills all of the storage space on a computer's hard drive or on a network.
Did You Know? Although there are many kinds of worms, both flat and round, we usually think of earthworms when someone mentions worms. Earthworms do not get a lot of respect these days, but Charles Darwin wrote an entire book explaining how important they are. "Long before [the plow] existed," he said, "the land was in fact regularly plowed and still continues to be thus plowed by earthworms. It may be doubted whether there are many other animals which have played so important a part in the history of the world." As they tunnel in the soil, earthworms open channels that allow in air and water. These channels improve drainage and make it easier for plants to send down roots. Earthworms eat and digest soil and the organic wastes it contains, and their own wastes provide nourishment for plants and other organisms. The tunneling of earthworms brings up nutrients from deep soils to the surface. It is estimated that each year, earthworms in one acre of land move 18 or more tons of soil. We enjoy the fruits of this labor in the form of rich soil and healthy vegetation.

worm


Past participle: wormed
Gerund: worming

Imperative
worm
worm
Present
I worm
you worm
he/she/it worms
we worm
you worm
they worm
Preterite
I wormed
you wormed
he/she/it wormed
we wormed
you wormed
they wormed
Present Continuous
I am worming
you are worming
he/she/it is worming
we are worming
you are worming
they are worming
Present Perfect
I have wormed
you have wormed
he/she/it has wormed
we have wormed
you have wormed
they have wormed
Past Continuous
I was worming
you were worming
he/she/it was worming
we were worming
you were worming
they were worming
Past Perfect
I had wormed
you had wormed
he/she/it had wormed
we had wormed
you had wormed
they had wormed
Future
I will worm
you will worm
he/she/it will worm
we will worm
you will worm
they will worm
Future Perfect
I will have wormed
you will have wormed
he/she/it will have wormed
we will have wormed
you will have wormed
they will have wormed
Future Continuous
I will be worming
you will be worming
he/she/it will be worming
we will be worming
you will be worming
they will be worming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been worming
you have been worming
he/she/it has been worming
we have been worming
you have been worming
they have been worming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been worming
you will have been worming
he/she/it will have been worming
we will have been worming
you will have been worming
they will have been worming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been worming
you had been worming
he/she/it had been worming
we had been worming
you had been worming
they had been worming
Conditional
I would worm
you would worm
he/she/it would worm
we would worm
you would worm
they would worm
Past Conditional
I would have wormed
you would have wormed
he/she/it would have wormed
we would have wormed
you would have wormed
they would have wormed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.worm - any of numerous relatively small elongated soft-bodied animals especially of the phyla Annelida and Chaetognatha and Nematoda and Nemertea and Platyhelminthes; also many insect larvae
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
helminth, parasitic worm - worm that is parasitic on the intestines of vertebrates especially roundworms and tapeworms and flukes
woodworm - a larva of a woodborer
acanthocephalan, spiny-headed worm - any of various worms living parasitically in intestines of vertebrates having a retractile proboscis covered with many hooked spines
arrowworm, chaetognath - any worm of the Chaetognatha; transparent marine worm with horizontal lateral and caudal fins and a row of movable curved spines at each side of the mouth
flatworm, platyhelminth - parasitic or free-living worms having a flattened body
nemertean, nemertine, proboscis worm, ribbon worm - soft unsegmented marine worms that have a threadlike proboscis and the ability to stretch and contract
beard worm, pogonophoran - slender animal with tentacles and a tubelike outer covering; lives on the deep ocean bottom
nematode, nematode worm, roundworm - unsegmented worms with elongated rounded body pointed at both ends; mostly free-living but some are parasitic
annelid, annelid worm, segmented worm - worms with cylindrical bodies segmented both internally and externally
2.worm - a person who has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
3.worm - a software program capable of reproducing itself that can spread from one computer to the next over a networkworm - a software program capable of reproducing itself that can spread from one computer to the next over a network; "worms take advantage of automatic file sending and receiving features found on many computers"
malevolent program - a computer program designed to have undesirable or harmful effects
4.worm - screw thread on a gear with the teeth of a worm wheel or rack
screw - a fastener with a tapered threaded shank and a slotted head
worm gear - gear consisting of a shaft with screw thread (the worm) that meshes with a toothed wheel (the worm wheel); changes the direction of the axis of rotary motion
Verb1.worm - to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling)worm - to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling); "The prisoner writhed in discomfort"; "The child tried to wriggle free from his aunt's embrace"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
wrench - make a sudden twisting motion

worm

noun
Related words
adjective vermiform, vermicular
fear helminthophobia

worm

verb
1. To move or proceed with short irregular motions up and down or from side to side:
2. To move along in a crouching or prone position:
3. To introduce gradually and slyly:
4. To make, achieve, or get through contrivance or guile:
Informal: finagle, wangle.
Translations
دُودَةدودَهيَتَسَلَّل، يَسيرُ بِبُطء
червей
červzávit
ormhivemøve sig
vermo
uss
matojengatkierremadella
crv
beférkõzik vhováféregkicsal vmit vkibõlkukac
cacing
ormurskríîa, mjaka sérveiîa e-î upp úr e-m
지렁이
vermis
izdibinātizkļūtizlīstizsprauktiesizvilkt
vierme
červíkvotrieť savytiahnuť z
črv
crvglista
mask
หนอน
kurtsolucanağır ağır dikkatle ilerlemekağzından zorla lâf almak
con giun

worm

[wɜːm]
A. N
1. (= earthworm) → gusano m, lombriz f
the worm will turnla paciencia tiene un límite
see also glow
2. (in fruit, vegetable) → gusano m (also Comput)
3. (Med) to have wormstener lombrices
4. (pej) (= person) → gusano m
B. VT
1. (= wriggle) he wormed his way out through the narrow windowsalió arrastrándose por la estrecha ventana
to worm one's way into a group (pej) → infiltrarse en un grupo
to worm one's way into sb's confidence (pej) → ganarse la confianza de algn
2. (pej) (= extract) to worm a secret out of sbarrancarle un secreto a algn
3. (= treat) [+ dog, cat, horse] → desparasitar
C. CPD worm powder Npolvos mpl antiparasitarios
worm tablet Ntableta f antiparasitaria

worm

[ˈwɜːrm]
n
(= animal) → ver m
(MEDICINE) to have worms → avoir des vers
(COMPUTING) (= computer virus) → ver m
vt
[+ dog, cat] → traiter contre les vers
to worm one's way into sth [+ sb's life] → s'insinuer dans qch; [+ position] → se hisser à qch
to worm sth out of sb → tirer les vers du nez à qn
It took me weeks to worm the facts out of him → J'ai mis des semaines à lui tirer les vers du nez.

worm

n
(lit, fig inf)Wurm m; (= wood worm)Holzwurm m; worms (Med) → Würmer pl; the worm has turned (prov) → das Blatt hat sich gewendet; to get a worm’s eye view of somethingetw aus der Froschperspektive sehen; to open a can of wormsin ein Wespennest stechen; this has opened a whole new can of wormsdas wirft ganz neue Probleme auf
(= screw)Schnecke f; (= thread)Schneckengewinde nt
(Comput, Internet) → Wurm m
vt
(= wriggle)zwängen; to worm one’s way along/through/into somethingsich an etw (dat)entlangdrücken/durch etw (acc)durchschlängeln/in etw (acc)hineinzwängen; to worm one’s way forward (= creep)sich nach vorne schleichen; to worm one’s way into a position/into a groupsich in eine Stellung/eine Gruppe einschleichen; to worm one’s way into somebody’s affectionsich bei jdm einschmeicheln; to worm one’s way out of a difficultysich aus einer schwierigen Lage herauswinden
(= extract) to worm something out of somebodyjdm etw entlocken; you have to worm everything out of himihm muss man die Würmer aus der Nase ziehen
dogeine Wurmkur machen mit (+dat)

worm

:
wormcast
n vom Regenwurm aufgeworfenes Erdhäufchen
worm-eaten
adj woodwurmstichig; (fig inf)wurmzerfressen
worm gear
wormhole
nWurmloch nt

worm

[wɜːm]
1. n (Zool, also) (person) (pej) → verme m
to have worms (Med) → avere i vermi
the worm will turn (Proverb) → anche la pazienza ha un limite
a can of worms (fam) → un vespaio
you worm! (fam) → verme!
2. vt
a. to worm one's way through a crowdinsinuarsi tra la folla
to worm one's way into a group → infiltrarsi in un gruppo
to worm one's way into sb's confidence → riuscire a conquistare la fiducia di qn
b. to worm a secret out of sbcarpire un segreto a qn

worm

(wəːm) noun
a kind of small creeping animal with a ringed body and no backbone; an earth-worm.
verb
1. to make (one's way) slowly or secretly. He wormed his way to the front of the crowd.
2. to get (information etc) with difficulty (out of someone). It took me hours to worm the true story out of him.

worm

دُودَة červ orm Wurm γαιοσκώληκας gusano mato ver crv verme 지렁이 worm mark robak minhoca червь mask หนอน solucan con giun 蠕虫

worm

n. lombriz, gusano.

worm

n gusano; (intestinal) lombriz f, gusano
References in classic literature ?
March's grave face relaxed, in spite of her efforts to keep sober, when she heard him declare that he would atone for his sins by all sorts of penances, and abase himself like a worm before the injured damsel.
It is unnecessary to dwell upon the evasive though polite manner with which the French general had eluded every attempt of Heyward to worm from him the purport of the communication he had proposed making, or on the decided, though still polished message, by which he now gave his enemy to understand, that, unless he chose to receive it in person, he should not receive it at all.
Nor run away, either," suggested the trodden worm, turning.
No, he answered, generally he's an early bird -- airley to bed and airley to rise --yes, he's the bird what catches the worm.
I know not how significant it is, or how far it is an evidence of singularity, that an individual should thus consent in his pettiest walk with the general movement of the race; but I know that something akin to the migratory instinct in birds and quadrupeds--which, in some instances, is known to have affected the squirrel tribe, impelling them to a general and mysterious movement, in which they were seen, say some, crossing the broadest rivers, each on its particular chip, with its tail raised for a sail, and bridging narrower streams with their dead--that something like the furor which affects the domestic cattle in the spring, and which is referred to a worm in their tails,--affects both nations and individuals, either perennially or from time to time.
A cringing worm is what you want, not a bright, smiling child.
I am little better than a devil at this moment; and, as my pastor there would tell me, deserve no doubt the sternest judgments of God, even to the quenchless fire and deathless worm.
That mean, fawning fellow, worm himself into such promotion
I could hardly have imagined dear old Joe looking so unlike himself or so like some extraordinary bird; standing, as he did, speechless, with his tuft of feathers ruffled, and his mouth open, as if he wanted a worm.
Thus talking hand in hand alone they pass'd On to thir blissful Bower; it was a place Chos'n by the sovran Planter, when he fram'd All things to mans delightful use; the roofe Of thickest covert was inwoven shade Laurel and Mirtle, and what higher grew Of firm and fragrant leaf; on either side ACANTHUS, and each odorous bushie shrub Fenc'd up the verdant wall; each beauteous flour, IRIS all hues, Roses, and Gessamin Rear'd high thir flourisht heads between, and wrought Mosaic; underfoot the Violet, Crocus, and Hyacinth with rich inlay Broiderd the ground, more colour'd then with stone Of costliest Emblem: other Creature here Beast, Bird, Insect, or Worm durst enter none; Such was thir awe of man.
It were unworthy to triumph over me It is a poor deed to crush a worm.
What the worm was to the corpse, his sins would be to the painted image on the canvas.