worrier


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wor·ry

 (wûr′ē, wŭr′ē)
v. wor·ried, wor·ry·ing, wor·ries
v.intr.
1. To feel uneasy or concerned about something; be troubled. See Synonyms at brood.
2.
a. To seize something with the teeth and bite or tear repeatedly: a squirrel worrying at a nut.
b. To touch or handle something nervously or persistently: worry at a hangnail.
c. To attempt to deal with something in a persistent or dogged manner: worried along at the problem.
v.tr.
1. To cause to feel anxious, distressed, or troubled. See Synonyms at trouble.
2.
a. To seize with the teeth and bite or tug at repeatedly: a dog worrying a bone.
b. To touch or handle nervously or persistently: worrying the loose tooth.
c. To attack roughly and repeatedly; harass: worrying the enemy ships.
d. To bother or annoy, as with petty complaints.
e. To attempt to deal with in a persistent or repeated manner: Analysts have worried the problem for a decade.
3. To chase and nip at or attack: a dog worrying steers.
n. pl. wor·ries
1. The act of worrying or the condition of being worried; persistent mental uneasiness: "Having come to a decision, the lad felt a sense of relief from the worry that had haunted him for many sleepless nights" (Edgar Rice Burroughs).
2. A source of nagging concern or uneasiness.
Idiom:
not to worry Informal
There is nothing to worry about; there is no need to be concerned: "But not to worry: it all ... falls into place in the book's second half, where the language is plainer" (Hallowell Bowser).

[Middle English werien, worien, to strangle, from Old English wyrgan; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

wor′ri·er n.
Word History: The ancestor of worry, the Old English verb wyrgan, meant "to strangle." Its Middle English descendant, worien, kept this sense and developed the new sense "to grasp by the throat with the teeth and lacerate" or "to kill or injure by biting and shaking." This is the way wolves might attack sheep, for example. In the 1500s worry began to be used in the sense "to harass, as by rough treatment or attack" or "to assault verbally," and in the 1600s the word took on the sense "to bother, distress, or persecute." It was a small step from this sense to the main modern senses "to cause to feel anxious or distressed" and "to feel troubled or uneasy," first recorded in the 1800s.

worrier

(ˈwʌrɪə)
n
a person who often worries about things
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.worrier - thinks about unfortunate things that might happen
killjoy, party pooper, spoilsport, wet blanket - someone who spoils the pleasure of others
Translations

worrier

[ˈwʌrɪə>ʳ] N to be a worrierser un/una agonías, ser un preocupón/una preocupona

worrier

[ˈwʌriər] ninquiet/iète m/f
to be a real worrier → être un anxieux(une)/euse
He's a real worrier → C'est un anxieux.

worrier

n she’s a great worriersie macht sich (dat)immerzu Sorgen

worrier

[ˈwʌrɪəʳ] nansioso/a
References in periodicals archive ?
1 Miniature pony calms down worrier A miniature Shetland pony named Rita is the key to the success story behind Thaqaffa, who bids to follow up his recent course win at Kempton in the 32Red Casino Handicap (7.
Had we not worried, had we left the next course of action to the non-worrier in the house (you can be sure that if a household has one worrier, there is no room for another), there would have been a minor crisis, a lot of running around, pushing and pulling, twisting of tubes and knobs, while the hungry guests looked at the clock and wondered when their meal would appear on the table.
He's always been a bit of a worrier and Brian has done a wonderful job to get him back after his fall at Ascot.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTIONS WEE THINKER ACROSS: 7 Deplete 9 April 10 Apron 11 Carrots 12 Car 13 Sealskin 16 Absinthe 17 Met 19 Galilee 21 Yobbo 22 Raven 23 St Kilda DOWN: 1 Advance 2 Spare rib 3 Rein 4 Lacrosse 5 Trio 6 Class 8 Enchantress 13 Shilling 14 Immobile 15 Ottoman 18 Aggro 20 Live 21 Yoke QUICKIE ACROSS: 1 Show of hands 8 Ali 9 Rap 11 Covered 12 Aware 13 Owe 14 Bit 15 Oil lamp 17 Net 19 Afar 21 Ogre 23 Acre 25 Coma 27 Ego 29 Bayonet 31 Nan 34 Hob 36 Aloud 37 Origami 38 Leg 39 Let 40 Co-operation DOWN: 1 Slow 2 Hive 3 Worrier 4 Fiddly 5 Alarm 6 Drab 7 Sari 8 Acorn 10 Peter 16 Par 18 Tom 20 Fee 22 Gab 24 Chemist 25 Canal 26 Colour 28 Orbit 30 Add up 32 Alec 33 No go 34 Halo 35 Omen
reveal that nearly half of Brits admit to being a worrier (47 per cent), yet nearly a third of people (31 per cent) claim that when something does worry them, they push it to the back of their mind.
Now, it turns out, there was method in my madness, according to researchers from Canada, who have found advantages to being a worrier.
Culture Worrier was published to coincide with Page's thirty-year anniversary at the paper.
Nothing worries the horse - he's playful, but he's not a worrier, as such.
The almost continuous anxiety of the worrier likely influences their proneness to experience many somatic discomforts (Jung, 1993) and less life satisfaction (Paolini, Yanez, & Kelly, 2006).
Told through protagonist Bayden, a real worrier, the journey from negative to positive sees Bayden searching through familiar play spaces, under his bed, in his toy box, even in his wardrobe, until the most obvious hiding place is staring right back at him.
The definition of being a teenager is to be a worrier.
gt;> You're most likely to be a worrier if you're a teen, aged 16-19.