worrier

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wor·ry

 (wûr′ē, wŭr′ē)
v. wor·ried, wor·ry·ing, wor·ries
v.intr.
1. To feel uneasy or concerned about something; be troubled. See Synonyms at brood.
2.
a. To seize something with the teeth and bite or tear repeatedly: a squirrel worrying at a nut.
b. To touch or handle something nervously or persistently: worry at a hangnail.
c. To attempt to deal with something in a persistent or dogged manner: worried along at the problem.
v.tr.
1. To cause to feel anxious, distressed, or troubled. See Synonyms at trouble.
2.
a. To seize with the teeth and bite or tug at repeatedly: a dog worrying a bone.
b. To touch or handle nervously or persistently: worrying the loose tooth.
c. To attack roughly and repeatedly; harass: worrying the enemy ships.
d. To bother or annoy, as with petty complaints.
e. To attempt to deal with in a persistent or repeated manner: Analysts have worried the problem for a decade.
3. To chase and nip at or attack: a dog worrying steers.
n. pl. wor·ries
1. The act of worrying or the condition of being worried; persistent mental uneasiness: "Having come to a decision, the lad felt a sense of relief from the worry that had haunted him for many sleepless nights" (Edgar Rice Burroughs).
2. A source of nagging concern or uneasiness.
Idiom:
not to worry Informal
There is nothing to worry about; there is no need to be concerned: "But not to worry: it all ... falls into place in the book's second half, where the language is plainer" (Hallowell Bowser).

[Middle English werien, worien, to strangle, from Old English wyrgan; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

wor′ri·er n.
Word History: The ancestor of worry, the Old English verb wyrgan, meant "to strangle." Its Middle English descendant, worien, kept this sense and developed the new sense "to grasp by the throat with the teeth and lacerate" or "to kill or injure by biting and shaking." This is the way wolves might attack sheep, for example. In the 1500s worry began to be used in the sense "to harass, as by rough treatment or attack" or "to assault verbally," and in the 1600s the word took on the sense "to bother, distress, or persecute." It was a small step from this sense to the main modern senses "to cause to feel anxious or distressed" and "to feel troubled or uneasy," first recorded in the 1800s.

worrier

(ˈwʌrɪə)
n
a person who often worries about things
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.worrier - thinks about unfortunate things that might happen
killjoy, party pooper, spoilsport, wet blanket - someone who spoils the pleasure of others
Translations

worrier

[ˈwʌrɪə>ʳ] N to be a worrierser un/una agonías, ser un preocupón/una preocupona

worrier

[ˈwʌriər] ninquiet/iète m/f
to be a real worrier → être un anxieux(une)/euse
He's a real worrier → C'est un anxieux.

worrier

n she’s a great worriersie macht sich (dat)immerzu Sorgen

worrier

[ˈwʌrɪəʳ] nansioso/a
References in periodicals archive ?
While much previous research has shown that expressive writing can help individuals process past traumas or stressful events, the current study suggests the same technique can help people especially worriers prepare for stressful tasks in the future.
And Belfast tops the list of worriers with 72% of city dwellers woken by concerns about an issue that hasn't been dealt with.
I'd prefer to watch Cage Worriers, with musclebound pugilists fretting about their lives: "I would take you down with a killer roundhouse kick but I've got a really important presentation to do at work next week, I'm not sure whether I locked the front door when I left the house, and global warming doesn't seem to be going away any time soon .
If so, now is your turn - and mine - to cock a snook at all those who said all that because, according to a recent article, worriers are more conscientious than their fellows, they are better planners and could well forge ahead of those laid back, take-life-as-it-comes types who drive us worriers around the bend
And even when the outcome is negative, 79 per cent of the time worriers say they ended up handling it better than they thought they would.
The worriers always want to find out from the Strength and Conditioning Coach EXACTLY what it is we're going to be doing when they know a big session is coming up.
The Fynach Fest features the Jazz Worriers, Alan Barnes and a number of guest bands playing a mixture of jazz styles.
The scientists at Lakehead University, Ontario, found those who admitted being worriers scored more highly on verbal intelligence tests and said worrying could have helped our ancestors survive.
Peshawar Dolphin defeated Worriers by three wickets in the cricket final while in table tennis singles Peshawar Lions beat Mansehra Panthers while in the doubles Mansehra Panthers defeated Dolphin in the final.
Sure enough, the brain reading of the positive thinkers was much less active than that of the worriers during the experiment.
Book Launching Author Allison Canale of Rutland launches her new book, "Ella and the Worry Doll,'' offering help to chronic worriers in the form a children's book and doll combination.
For example, why not call themselves Warwickshire Worriers, Wizards, Wolves, which although all cheesy, are better than Birmingham, who I don't want to be associated with.