wouldst

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Related to wouldest: wouldst

wouldst

 (wo͝odst) or would·est (wo͝od′ĭst)
v. Archaic
Second person singular past tense of will2.

wouldst

(wʊdst)
vb
archaic or dialect (used with the pronoun: thou or its relative equivalent) a singular form of the past tense of will1

will1

(wɪl)

auxiliary v.andv., pres. will; auxiliary verb.
1. am (is, are, etc.) about or going to: I will be there tomorrow. She will see you at dinner.
2. am (is, are, etc.) disposed or willing to: People will do right.
3. am (is, are, etc.) expected or required to: You will report to the principal at once.
4. may be expected or supposed to: You will not have forgotten him.
5. am (is, are, etc.) determined or sure to (used emphatically): People will talk.
6. am (is, are, etc.) accustomed to, or do usually or often: She would write for hours at a time.
7. am (is, are, etc.) habitually disposed or inclined to: Tyrants will be tyrants.
8. am (is, are, etc.) capable of; can: This tree will live without water for three months.
v.t., v.i.
9. to wish; desire; like: Take what you will. Ask, if you will, who the owner is.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English wyllan, c. Old Saxon willian, Old Norse vilja, Gothic wiljan; akin to Latin velle to wish]
usage: See shall.

will2

(wɪl)

n.
1. the faculty of conscious and particularly of deliberate action: the freedom of the will.
2. power of choosing one's own actions: to have a strong will.
3. the act or process of using or asserting one's choice; volition: My hands are obedient to my will.
4. wish or desire: to submit against one's will.
5. purpose or determination: to have the will to succeed.
6. the wish or purpose as carried out, or to be carried out: to work one's will.
7. disposition, whether good or ill, toward another.
8. a legal document in which a person specifies the disposition of his or her property after death. Compare testament.
v.t.
9. to decide upon, bring about, or attempt to effect or bring about by an act of will: He can walk if he wills it.
10. to purpose, determine on, or elect by act of will: If you will success, you can find it.
11. to dispose of (property) by a will; bequeath.
12. to influence by or as if by exerting will power: I willed her to survive the crisis.
v.i.
13. to exercise the will.
14. to decide or determine: Others debate, but the king wills.
Idioms:
at will, as one desires; whenever one chooses: to wander off at will.
[before 900; Middle English will(e), Old English will(a), c. Old Saxon willio, Old High German willo, Old Norse vili, Gothic wilja; akin to will1]
will′er, n.
will′-less, adj.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Step on board and let him conduct thee; but if thou wouldest behold thy kingdom again, see that thou takest not the name of Allah into thy mouth.
Jesus saith unto her, Said I not unto thee that if thou wouldest believe, thou shouldest see the glory of God?
I fear me, love, if that I had been dead, Thou wouldest not have mourned so much for me.
Jehovah thy God hath led thee these forty years in the wilderness, that he might humble thee, to prove thee, to know what was in thy heart, whether thou wouldest keep his commandments, or not.
The boy's concern gives the aging Santiago's loss of independence an almost biblical resonance: "When thou wast young, thou girdest thyself, and walkedst whither thou wouldest: but when thou shalt be old, thou shalt stretch forth thy hands, and another shall gird thee, and carry thee whither thou wouldest not" (John 21:18).
And thou shalt remember al the iourney, through the which the Lord thy God hath brought thee fourtie yeares by the desert, that he might afflict and prove thee, and that the thinges that were in thy hart might be made knowen, whether thou wouldest keepe his commandementes or not.
abide here and keep this house with me, and wouldest be immortal, for
As an early example of this word, in its theological meaning, the OLD presents a passage from The Book of Common Prayer (1559), one of the Collects from "On Good Friday"; the Elizabethan Prayer Book (1559), the version used by the Church of England, reads: "MERCIFUL God, who hast made all men, and hatest nothing that thou hast made, nor wouldest the death of a sinner, but rather that he should be converted and live" (144).
these thinges whiche belonge unto thy peace, even at this daie, thou wouldest take hede.
Oh my Cursed Soul, I say; think, O My Cursed, hell hardened soul, how thou woul'st Shiver, how thou wouldest Sink, how thou wouldest Despair, this moment to hear the Great arch Angels trumpet Send forth its loud, and Shril Echoes, to hear his Dreadfull voice, Arise ye Dead, and Come, ye Dead, and living to judgment, to Christ's most Aufull tribunell.
THE TEXT: "And when thou goest forth to war against thine enemies, and the Lord thy God hath delivered them into thine hands, and thou hast taken them captive, And seest among the captives a beautiful woman, and hast a desire unto her, that thou wouldest have her to thy wife; Then thou shalt bring her home to thine house; and she shall shave her head, and pare her nails; And she shall put the raiment of her captivity from off her, and shall remain in thine house, and bewail her father and her mother a full month: and after that thou shalt go in unto her, and be her husband, and she shall be thy wife.
Emerson recounts that on Tuesday, 11 August the party rose early to go to Mount Washington and "strove to get a look, At thy head Agiocochook, but, thou, says the guide book, lovest to scoff, & wouldest not take they night cap off.

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