wounded


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Related to wounded: Wounded Knee

wound 1

 (wo͞ond)
n.
1. An injury to an organism, especially one in which the skin or another external surface is torn, pierced, cut, or otherwise broken.
2. An injury to the feelings.
v. wound·ed, wound·ing, wounds
v.tr.
To inflict wounds or a wound on.
v.intr.
To inflict wounds or a wound: harsh criticism that wounds.

[Middle English, from Old English wund; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]

wound′ed·ly adv.
wound′ing·ly adv.

wound 2

 (wound)
v.
Past tense and past participle of wind2.

wound 3

 (wound)
v. Music
A past tense and a past participle of wind3.

wounded

(ˈwuːndɪd)
adj
1. (Pathology)
a. suffering from wounds; injured, esp in a battle or fight
b. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the wounded.
2. (of feelings) damaged or hurt

wound•ed

(ˈwun dɪd)

adj.
1. suffering from a wound or wounds.
2. hurt; impaired; damaged: a wounded reputation.
n.
3. wounded persons collectively (often prec. by the).
[before 1000]

wounded

See: seriously wounded; slightly wounded.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wounded - people who are woundedwounded - people who are wounded; "they had to leave the wounded where they fell"
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
Adj.1.wounded - suffering from physical injury especially that suffered in battlewounded - suffering from physical injury especially that suffered in battle; "nursing his wounded arm"; "ambulances...for the hurt men and women"
injured - harmed; "injured soldiers"; "injured feelings"
Translations
الجَرْحىمَجْروح
sårede
sebesültsebesültek
særîir, fólk sem hefur særstsærîur
ranenízranený
ranjenranjenci
yaralıyaralılar

wounded

[ˈwuːndɪd]
A. ADJherido
there were six dead and fifteen woundedhubo seis muertos y quince heridos
B. NPL the woundedlos heridos

wounded

[ˈwuːndɪd]
adj
(= injured) → blessé(e)
two wounded men → deux blessés
(emotionally)blessé(e)
npl
the wounded → les blesséswound up [ˌwaʊndˈʌp] adjremonté(e)

wounded

[ˈwuːndɪd]
1. adj (also) (fig) → ferito/a
a wounded man → un ferito
2. npl the woundedi feriti

wound2

(wuːnd) noun
a physical hurt or injury. The wound that he had received in the war still gave him pain occasionally; He died from a bullet-wound.
verb
1. to hurt or injure physically. He didn't kill the animal – he just wounded it; He was wounded in the battle.
2. to hurt (someone's feelings). to wound someone's pride.
ˈwounded adjective
having been injured, especially in war etc. the wounded man.
noun plural
wounded people, especially soldiers. How many wounded are there?

wounded

adj herido; the — los heridos
References in classic literature ?
And, sir," continued the wounded man, "I suffer much and would like, if possible, to be carried to some house.
Go," said he, "fleet Iris, and speak thus to Hector--say that so long as he sees Agamemnon heading his men and making havoc of the Trojan ranks, he is to keep aloof and bid the others bear the brunt of the battle, but when Agamemnon is wounded either by spear or arrow, and takes to his chariot, then will I vouchsafe him strength to slay till he reach the ships and night falls at the going down of the sun.
When the wounded man was carried to his bed, and the house began again to clear up from the hurry which this accident had occasioned, the landlady thus addressed the commanding officer: "I am afraid, sir," said she, "this young man did not behave himself as well as he should do to your honours; and if he had been killed, I suppose he had but his desarts: to be sure, when gentlemen admit inferior parsons into their company, they oft to keep their distance; but, as my first husband used to say, few of 'em know how to do it.
But the Jews, both male and female, possessed and practised the medical science in all its branches, and the monarchs and powerful barons of the time frequently committed themselves to the charge of some experienced sage among this despised people, when wounded or in sickness.
I saw many brave men cut down, many fall mortally wounded from their saddles.
The duelists sat down; a student official stepped forward, examined the wounded head and touched the place with a sponge once or twice; the surgeon came and turned back the hair from the wound-- and revealed a crimson gash two or three inches long, and proceeded to bind an oval piece of leather and a bunch of lint over it; the tally-keeper stepped up and tallied one for the opposition in his book.
Finding, then, that, in fact he could not move, he thought himself of having recourse to his usual remedy, which was to think of some passage in his books, and his craze brought to his mind that about Baldwin and the Marquis of Mantua, when Carloto left him wounded on the mountain side, a story known by heart by the children, not forgotten by the young men, and lauded and even believed by the old folk; and for all that not a whit truer than the miracles of Mahomet.
All of a sudden Robbers rushed upon them from their hiding-places, and in the scuffle with their owners, wounded with a sword the Mule carrying the treasure, which they greedily seized while taking no notice of the grain.
How many they killed or wounded they knew not, but the consternation and surprise was inexpressible among the savages; they were frightened to the last degree to hear such a dreadful noise, and see their men killed, and others hurt, but see nobody that did it; when, in the middle of their fright, Will Atkins and his other three let fly again among the thickest of them; and in less than a minute the first three, being loaded again, gave them a third volley.
Though the troops were ill-clad, exhausted, and had lost a third of their number in killed, wounded, sick, and stragglers; though a number of sick and wounded had been abandoned on the other side of the Danube with a letter in which Kutuzov entrusted them to the humanity of the enemy; and though the big hospitals and the houses in Krems converted into military hospitals could no longer accommodate all the sick and wounded, yet the stand made at Krems and the victory over Mortier raised the spirits of the army considerably.
Marmaduke received the offered hand of the other with a smile, that showed, however he might be astonished at his suspicion, he had ceased to resent it; while the wounded youth stood, gazing from his red friend to his host, with interest powerfully delineated in his countenance.
Besides, his intention was formed to make the brave Musketeer all suitable apologies, but without meanness or weakness, fearing that might result from this duel which generally results from an affair of this kind, when a young and vigorous man fights with an adversary who is wounded and weakened--if conquered, he doubles the triumph of his antagonist; if a conqueror, he is accused of foul play and want of courage.