wounding


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Related to wounding: malicious wounding

wound 1

 (wo͞ond)
n.
1. An injury to an organism, especially one in which the skin or another external surface is torn, pierced, cut, or otherwise broken.
2. An injury to the feelings.
v. wound·ed, wound·ing, wounds
v.tr.
To inflict wounds or a wound on.
v.intr.
To inflict wounds or a wound: harsh criticism that wounds.

[Middle English, from Old English wund; see wen- in Indo-European roots.]

wound′ed·ly adv.
wound′ing·ly adv.

wound 2

 (wound)
v.
Past tense and past participle of wind2.

wound 3

 (wound)
v. Music
A past tense and a past participle of wind3.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wounding - the act of inflicting a wound
scathe, damage, harm, hurt - the act of damaging something or someone
Adj.1.wounding - causing physical or especially psychological injury; "a stabbing remark"; "wounding and false charges of disloyalty"
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"

wounding

Translations

wounding

[ˈwuːndɪŋ] ADJ [remark, tone] → hiriente

wounding

adj remark, toneverletzend

wounding

[ˈwuːndɪŋ] adj (blow, remark) → che lascia il segno
References in classic literature ?
The sullen soldiers shouldered their empty tubes and fell into their places, like men whose blood had been heated by the past contest, and who only desired the opportunity to revenge an indignity which was still wounding to their pride, concealed as it was under the observances of military etiquette.
So that tormented to madness, he was now churning through the water, violently flailing with his flexible tail, and tossing the keen spade about him, wounding and murdering his own comrades.
He tore his way through his persecutors, flinging one of them clear over the parapet; he bowled a horse and his rider down, and plunged straight for the next, got home with his horns, wounding both horse and man; on again, here and there and this way and that; and one after another he tore the bowels out of two horses so that they gushed to the ground, and ripped a third one so badly that although they rushed him to cover and shoved his bowels back and stuffed the rents with tow and rode him against the bull again, he couldn't make the trip; he tried to gallop, under the spur, but soon reeled and tottered and fell, all in a heap.
They were allowed to rest a moment, every little while; they got other rests by wounding each other, for then they could sit down while the doctor applied the lint and bandages.
As to her present needs, there are certain things only a woman ought to do for a girl, and I should not like to have you do them for Rebecca; I should feel that I was wounding her pride and self-respect, even though she were ignorant; but there is no reason why I may not do them if necessary and let you pay her traveling expenses.