wove


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wove

 (wōv)
v.
Past tense of weave.

wove

(wəʊv)
vb
a past tense of weave

weave

(wiv)

v. wove (esp. for 5,9 ) weaved; wo•ven wove; weav•ing; v.t.
1. to interlace (threads, yarns, strips, fibrous material, etc.) so as to form a fabric or material.
2. to form by such interlacing: to weave a basket; to weave cloth.
3. (of a spider or larva) to spin (a web or cocoon).
4. to form by combining various elements or details into a connected whole: to weave a tale.
5. to introduce as an element into a connected whole (usu. fol. by in or into): to weave a folk song into a musical comedy.
6. to combine (two or more things) so as to form a whole.
7. to make or move by winding or zigzagging, esp. to avoid obstructions: to weave one's way across a crowded room.
v.i.
8. to form or construct something by interlacing materials or combining elements.
9. to move or proceed in a winding course or from side to side: a car weaving through traffic.
n.
10. a pattern of or method for interlacing yarns.
[before 900; Middle English weven, Old English wefan, c. Middle Low German, Middle Dutch weven, Old High German weban, Old Norse vefa; akin to web; (definitions 5,9) in part continuing Middle English weven to wander, move to and fro < Old Norse veifa (compare waif)]
Translations

weave

(wiːv) past tense wove (wouv) : past participle woven (ˈwouvən) verb
1. to make by crossing strands in a pattern. to weave cloth.
2. to tell (an interesting story).
3. (past tense, past participle weaved) to move backwards and forwards or from side to side. The cyclist weaved in and out of the traffic.
ˈweaver noun
References in classic literature ?
And of this, one thing is sure: if once we wove withes into baskets, the next and inevitable step would have been the weaving of cloth.
But Anne, with her elbows on the window sill, her soft cheek laid against her clasped hands, and her eyes filled with visions, looked out unheedingly across city roof and spire to that glorious dome of sunset sky and wove her dreams of a possible future from the golden tissue of youth's own optimism.
In the eighteenth century, in England, men and women wove cloth on hand-looms in their own cottages.