wove


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wove

 (wōv)
v.
Past tense of weave.

wove

(wəʊv)
vb
a past tense of weave

weave

(wiv)

v. wove (esp. for 5,9 ) weaved; wo•ven wove; weav•ing; v.t.
1. to interlace (threads, yarns, strips, fibrous material, etc.) so as to form a fabric or material.
2. to form by such interlacing: to weave a basket; to weave cloth.
3. (of a spider or larva) to spin (a web or cocoon).
4. to form by combining various elements or details into a connected whole: to weave a tale.
5. to introduce as an element into a connected whole (usu. fol. by in or into): to weave a folk song into a musical comedy.
6. to combine (two or more things) so as to form a whole.
7. to make or move by winding or zigzagging, esp. to avoid obstructions: to weave one's way across a crowded room.
v.i.
8. to form or construct something by interlacing materials or combining elements.
9. to move or proceed in a winding course or from side to side: a car weaving through traffic.
n.
10. a pattern of or method for interlacing yarns.
[before 900; Middle English weven, Old English wefan, c. Middle Low German, Middle Dutch weven, Old High German weban, Old Norse vefa; akin to web; (definitions 5,9) in part continuing Middle English weven to wander, move to and fro < Old Norse veifa (compare waif)]
Translations

weave

(wiːv) past tense wove (wouv) : past participle woven (ˈwouvən) verb
1. to make by crossing strands in a pattern. to weave cloth.
2. to tell (an interesting story).
3. (past tense, past participle weaved) to move backwards and forwards or from side to side. The cyclist weaved in and out of the traffic.
ˈweaver noun
References in classic literature ?
As he talked along, softly, pleasantly, flowingly, he seemed to drift away imperceptibly out of this world and time, and into some remote era and old forgotten country; and so he gradually wove such a spell about me that I seemed to move among the specters and shadows and dust and mold of a gray antiquity, holding speech with a relic of it
Once I saw thee in dark night, In supernatural Beauty bright; Of Light-rays, was the Figure wove, To share its light, locked-hair strove.
Their sense of his usefulness would have counteracted any repugnance or suspicion which was not confirmed by a deficiency in the quality or the tale of the cloth he wove for them.
About them frisking playd All Beasts of th' Earth, since wilde, and of all chase In Wood or Wilderness, Forrest or Den; Sporting the Lion rampd, and in his paw Dandl'd the Kid; Bears, Tygers, Ounces, Pards Gambold before them, th' unwieldy Elephant To make them mirth us'd all his might, & wreathd His Lithe Proboscis; close the Serpent sly Insinuating, wove with Gordian twine His breaded train, and of his fatal guile Gave proof unheeded; others on the grass Coucht, and now fild with pasture gazing sat, Or Bedward ruminating: for the Sun Declin'd was hasting now with prone carreer To th' Ocean Iles, and in th' ascending Scale Of Heav'n the Starrs that usher Evening rose: When SATAN still in gaze, as first he stood, Scarce thus at length faild speech recoverd sad.
I desired the queen's woman to save for me the combings of her majesty's hair, whereof in time I got a good quantity; and consulting with my friend the cabinet-maker, who had received general orders to do little jobs for me, I directed him to make two chair-frames, no larger than those I had in my box, and to bore little holes with a fine awl, round those parts where I designed the backs and seats; through these holes I wove the strongest hairs I could pick out, just after the manner of cane chairs in England.
I know his worship," said the curate; "that is where Senor Reinaldos of Montalvan figures with his friends and comrades, greater thieves than Cacus, and the Twelve Peers of France with the veracious historian Turpin; however, I am not for condemning them to more than perpetual banishment, because, at any rate, they have some share in the invention of the famous Matteo Boiardo, whence too the Christian poet Ludovico Ariosto wove his web, to whom, if I find him here, and speaking any language but his own, I shall show no respect whatever; but if he speaks his own tongue I will put him upon my head.
Madame Aubain brought out her sewing, and Virginia amused herself by braiding reeds; Felicite wove lavender blossoms, while Paul was bored and wished to go home.