wrath


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Related to wrath: Grapes of Wrath

wrath

 (răth, räth)
n.
1. Forceful, often vindictive anger. See Synonyms at anger.
2. Punishment or vengeance as a manifestation of anger.
adj. Archaic
Wrathful.

[Middle English, from Old English wrǣththu, from wrāth, angry; see wer- in Indo-European roots. Adj., variant of wroth.]

wrath

(rɒθ)
n
1. angry, violent, or stern indignation
2. divine vengeance or retribution
3. archaic a fit of anger or an act resulting from anger
adj
obsolete incensed; angry
[Old English wrǣththu; see wroth]
ˈwrathless adj

Wrath

(rɒθ; rɔːθ)
n
(Placename) Cape Wrath a promontory at the NW extremity of the Scottish mainland

wrath

(ræθ, rɑθ; esp. Brit. rɔθ)

n.
1. stern or fierce anger; deep indignation; ire.
2. vengeance or punishment as the consequence of anger.
[before 900; Middle English wraththe, Old English wrǣththo=wrāth wroth]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wrath - intense anger (usually on an epic scale)
fury, rage, madness - a feeling of intense anger; "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned"; "his face turned red with rage"
2.wrath - belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)wrath - belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)
deadly sin, mortal sin - an unpardonable sin entailing a total loss of grace; "theologians list seven mortal sins"

wrath

noun anger, passion, rage, temper, fury, resentment, irritation, indignation, ire, displeasure, exasperation, choler His action incurred the wrath of animal rights activists.
delight, pleasure, joy, satisfaction, happiness, enjoyment, amusement, gratification, contentment, gladness
Quotations
"I was angry with my friend,"
"I told my wrath, my wrath did end."
"I was angry with my foe,"
"I told it not, my wrath did grow" [William Blake A Poison Tree]
"nursing her wrath to keep it warm" [Robert Burns Tam o' Shanter]
"wrath: anger of a superior quality and degree, appropriate to exalted characters and momentous occasions" [Ambrose Bierce The Devil's Dictionary]

wrath

noun
Violent or unrestrained anger:
Translations
غَضَب شَديد، حَنَق
hněv
vrede
raivoviha
gnjev
heift, bræîi
dusmasniknums
vrede

wrath

[rɒθ] N (poet) [of person] → cólera f; [of storm] → ira f, furia f
see also incur

wrath

[ˈrɒθ] n [person] → courroux m; [God] → colère f; [gods] → courroux m

wrath

nZorn m; (liter, of storm) → Wut f

wrath

[rɒθ] n (liter) → ira, collera

wrath

(roθ) , ((American) rӕθ) noun
violent anger.
ˈwrathful adjective
References in classic literature ?
and, ordering Roderigo up, banished him form the kingdom with wrath and scorn.
As his hard knuck- les beat down into the frightened face of the school- master, his wrath became more and more terrible.
And it rendered his aspect not the less, but more frightful, that it seemed not to express wrath or hatred, but a certain hot fellness of purpose, which annihilated everything but itself.
If the children gathered about her, as they sometimes did, Pearl would grow positively terrible in her puny wrath, snatching up stones to fling at them, with shrill, incoherent exclamations, that made her mother tremble, because they had so much the sound of a witch's anathemas in some unknown tongue.
For a moment the terror of Hans Van Ripper's wrath passed across his mind, --for it was his Sunday saddle; but this was no time for petty fears; the goblin was hard on his haunches; and (unskilful rider that he was
From thence it is the storm of God's quick wrath is first descried, and the bow must bear the earliest brunt.
It was all too true to be disputed, and the unlucky man had to pocket his wrath with the best grace he was able, and all three faced to the right about, and took up their line of march for the highway.
They are full of admiration of his vast bulk and his prodigious strength; they speak with pride of the fact that he can do a hundred marvels which are far and away beyond their own powers; and they speak with the same pride of the fact that in his wrath he is able to drive a thousand men before him.
The judge's wrath began to kindle, and he burst out:
He was so brimful of exultation that he could hardly hold him- self when the old lady came back and stood above the wreck discharging lightnings of wrath from over her spectacles.
I found him very angry; he could scarce restrain his wrath.
Fortunately, the beasts seemed more bent on stretching their paws, and yawning, and flourishing their tails, than devouring me alive; but they would suffer no resurrection, and I was forced to lie till their malignant masters pleased to deliver me: then, hatless and trembling with wrath, I ordered the miscreants to let me out - on their peril to keep me one minute longer - with several incoherent threats of retaliation that, in their indefinite depth of virulency, smacked of King Lear.