wreath


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wreath

 (rēth)
n. pl. wreaths (rēthz, rēths)
1.
a. A ring or circlet of freshly cut or dried flowers, boughs, or leaves worn on the head, placed on a memorial, or hung as a decoration.
b. A similar ornamental ring made of wood, plastic, or other materials.
2. A curling or circular form: a wreath of smoke.

[Middle English wrethe, from Old English writha, band; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

wreath

(riːθ)
n, pl wreaths (riːðz; riːθs)
1. (Art Terms) a band of flowers or foliage intertwined into a ring, usually placed on a grave as a memorial or worn on the head as a garland or a mark of honour
2. any circular or spiral band or formation
3. (Ceramics) a spiral or circular defect appearing in porcelain and glassware
[Old English wrǣth, wrǣd; related to Middle Low German wrēden to twist. See writhe]
ˈwreathless adj
ˈwreathˌlike adj

wreath

(riθ)

n., pl. wreaths (rētz, rēths),
n.
1. a circular band of flowers, foliage, etc., for adorning the head or for any decorative purpose; garland or chaplet.
2. any ringlike, curving, or curling mass or formation: a wreath of clouds.
v.t., v.i.
3. to wreathe.
[before 1000; Middle English wrethe, Old English writha something wound or coiled; akin to writhe]

Wreath

 a garland or intertwined chaplet; a drift of snow or sand.
Examples: wreaths of fire, 1789; wreath of flowers; of sand; of sea, 1875; of smoke, 1859; of snow, 1725; of vapour, 1794; of worms, 1684.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wreath - flower arrangement consisting of a circular band of foliage or flowers for ornamental purposeswreath - flower arrangement consisting of a circular band of foliage or flowers for ornamental purposes
crown - a wreath or garland worn on the head to signify victory
floral arrangement, flower arrangement - a decorative arrangement of flowers
bay wreath, laurel wreath, laurel - (antiquity) a wreath of laurel foliage worn on the head as an emblem of victory

wreath

noun garland, band, ring, crown, loop, festoon, coronet, chaplet She wore a wreath of jasmine flowers in her hair.
Translations
إكْليلحَلَقَةٌ من الدُّخان
kranssky
kiehkurakranssilakipunosseppeleseppelöidä
füstkarikakoszorú
spírall, vafningur, snúningursveigur, krans
skendėtivainikas
grīstestrūklavainags
obláčik
venec
krans
çelenkduman halkası

wreath

[riːθ] N (wreaths (pl)) [riːðz] [of flowers] → guirnalda f; (for funeral) → corona f; [of smoke, mist] → espiral m
laurel wreathcorona f de laurel

wreath

[ˈriːθ] [wreaths] [ˈriːðz ˈriːθs] (pl) ncouronne f

wreath

n pl <-s> → Kranz m; wreath of laurelLorbeerkranz m

wreath

[riːθ] n (wreaths (pl)) [riːðz] (of flowers) → ghirlanda; (at funeral) → corona; (of smoke) → anello; (mist) → corona

wreath

(riːθ) plural wreaths (riːθs riːðz) noun
1. a circular garland of flowers or leaves, placed at a grave, or put on someone's shoulders or head after his/her victory etc. We put a wreath of flowers on her mother's grave.
2. a drift or curl of smoke, mist etc. wreaths of smoke.
wreathe (riːð) verb
to cover. faces wreathed in smiles.
References in classic literature ?
Laurie dug a grave under the ferns in the grove, little Pip was laid in, with many tears by his tender-hearted mistress, and covered with moss, while a wreath of violets and chickweed was hung on the stone which bore his epitaph, composed by Jo while she struggled with the dinner.
It is true there were short and fleeting moments, when the fiery eyes of Magua were seen glittering, like the fabled organs of the basilisk through the dusty wreath by which he was enveloped, and he read by those short and deadly glances the fate of the combat in the presence of his enemies; ere, however, any hostile hand could descend on his devoted head, its place was filled by the scowling visage of Chingachgook.
You would almost think a great gun had been discharged; and if you noticed the light wreath of vapor from the spiracle at his other extremity, you would think that that was the smoke from the touch-hole.
There sat Tom, on a little mossy seat in the court, every one of his button-holes stuck full of cape jessamines, and Eva, gayly laughing, was hanging a wreath of roses round his neck; and then she sat down on his knee, like a chip-sparrow, still laughing.
It was of white chip with a wreath of cheap white roses and green leaves, and cost between two and three dollars, an unprecedented sum in Rebecca's experience.
Miss Woodhouse appeared more than once, and never without a something of pleasing connexion, either a compliment to her taste, or a remembrance of what she had said; and in the very last time of its meeting her eye, unadorned as it was by any such broad wreath of gallantry, she yet could discern the effect of her influence and acknowledge the greatest compliment perhaps of all conveyed.
Bessie had been down into the kitchen, and she brought up with her a tart on a certain brightly painted china plate, whose bird of paradise, nestling in a wreath of convolvuli and rosebuds, had been wont to stir in me a most enthusiastic sense of admiration; and which plate I had often petitioned to be allowed to take in my hand in order to examine it more closely, but had always hitherto been deemed unworthy of such a privilege.
I let him enjoy the luxury unannoyed; and after sucking out his last wreath, and heaving a profound sigh, he got up, and departed as solemnly as he came.
Its feet, observable beneath the ample folds of the garment, were also bare; and on its head it wore no other covering than a holly wreath, set here and there with shining icicles.
As when a Ship by skilful Stearsman wrought Nigh Rivers mouth or Foreland, where the Wind Veres oft, as oft so steers, and shifts her Saile; So varied hee, and of his tortuous Traine Curld many a wanton wreath in sight of EVE, To lure her Eye; shee busied heard the sound Of rusling Leaves, but minded not, as us'd To such disport before her through the Field, From every Beast, more duteous at her call, Then at CIRCEAN call the Herd disguis'd.
And upon brows more worthy could a wreath of chivalry never be placed
The praise of folly, as he went on, soared into a philosophy, and philosophy herself became young, and catching the mad music of pleasure, wearing, one might fancy, her wine-stained robe and wreath of ivy, danced like a Bacchante over the hills of life, and mocked the slow Silenus for being sober.