wreckage


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wreck·age

 (rĕk′ĭj)
n.
The debris or remains of something wrecked: the wreckage of a plane crash; flood wreckage.

wreckage

(ˈrɛkɪdʒ)
n
1. same as wreck6
2. the act of wrecking or the state of being wrecked; ruin or destruction

wreck•age

(ˈrɛk ɪdʒ)

n.
1. the act of wrecking, or the state of being wrecked.
2. remains or fragments of something that has been wrecked: They searched the wreckage for survivors.
[1830–40]

Wreckage

 fragments of the remains of shipwrecks or damaged buildings, 1874.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wreckage - the remaining parts of something that has been wrecked; "they searched the wreckage for signs of survivors"
flotsam, jetsam - the floating wreckage of a ship
lagan, lagend, ligan - goods (or wreckage) on the sea bed that is attached to a buoy so that it can be recovered
part, portion - something less than the whole of a human artifact; "the rear part of the house"; "glue the two parts together"

wreckage

noun remains, pieces, ruin, fragments, debris, rubble, hulk, wrack Mark was dragged from the burning wreckage of his car.

wreckage

noun
1. An act, instance, or consequence of breaking:
2. The act of destroying or state of being destroyed:
3. The remains of something destroyed, disintegrated, or decayed:
Translations
حُطَامحُطام سَفينَه أو طائِرَه
trosky
vrag
romu
ostaci
flak
残骸
잔해
razbitine
vrakspillror
ซากปรักหักพัง
đống đổ nát

wreckage

[ˈrekɪdʒ] N
1. (= remains) [of ship] → restos mpl de un naufragio, pecios mpl de un naufragio (frm); [of car, aeroplane, train] → restos mpl; [of house, building] → escombros mpl, ruinas fpl
2. (= act) [of ship] → naufragio m (fig) → naufragio m, ruina f, destrucción f

wreckage

[ˈrɛkɪdʒ] n [plane, car, ship] → épave f; [building] → décombres mpl

wreckage

n (lit, fig: = remains) → Trümmer pl; (of ship also)Wrackteile pl; (washed ashore) → Strandgut nt; (of house, town)Ruinen pl

wreckage

[ˈrɛkɪdʒ] n (of ship) → relitto; (of car) → rottami mpl; (of building) → macerie fpl

wreck

(rek) noun
1. a very badly damaged ship. The divers found a wreck on the sea-bed.
2. something in a very bad condition. an old wreck of a car; I feel a wreck after cleaning the house.
3. the destruction of a ship at sea. The wreck of the Royal George.
verb
to destroy or damage very badly. The ship was wrecked on rocks in a storm; My son has wrecked my car; You have wrecked my plans.
ˈwreckage (-kidʒ) noun
the remains of something wrecked. After the accident, the wreckage (of the cars) was removed from the motorway.

wreckage

حُطَام trosky vrag Trümmer συντρίμμια escombros romu décombres ostaci rottami 残骸 잔해 wrak vrakrester szczątki destroços, escombros обломки после катастрофы vrakspillror ซากปรักหักพัง enkaz đống đổ nát 残骸
References in classic literature ?
Yes, Arethusa herself and Pandora, whom we all know by her box, looked down upon the two new managers of the Opera, who ended by clutching at some piece of wreckage and from there stared silently at Box Five on the grand tier.
He was able to push back the wreckage with ease and step out.
An examination of the wreckage showed that their greatest danger, now, lay in fire, for the flames were licking hungrily at the splintered wood of the wrecked cabin, and had already found a foothold upon the lower deck through a great jagged hole which the explosion had opened.
When Pete arrived Maggie, in a worn black dress, was waiting for him in the midst of a floor strewn with wreckage.
Afterwards it used to turn up in all sorts of places--at the bottom of small drawers, among my studs in cardboard boxes--till at last it found permanent rest in a large wooden bowl containing some loose keys, bits of sealing wax, bits of string, small broken chains, a few buttons, and similar minute wreckage that washes out of a man's life into such receptacles.
The Vaterland was no longer fighting the gale; her smashed and exploded engines throbbed no more; she was disabled and driving before the wind as smoothly as a balloon, a huge, windspread, tattered cloud of aerial wreckage.
We had come quite close to the city when my attention was attracted toward a tall, black shaft that reared its head several hundred feet into the air from what appeared to be a tangled mass of junk or wreckage, now partially snow-covered.
When the turbulent waters had somewhat subsided and the sea had ceased to spew up wreckage, I ventured to swim back in search of something substantial enough to support my weight and that of Nobs as well.
The first was a mass of wreckage floating beside the derelict in the midst of which, bottom up, rose and fell an overturned lifeboat; the other was the faint, dim line of a far-distant shore showing on the horizon in the east.
The wreckage of the spring washing appeared everywhere--piles of sluice-boxes, sections of elevated flumes, huge water-wheels,--all the debris of an army of gold-mad men.
There was a rush of sailors across the wreckage of the fore- topmast to the forecastle to pack their bags.
Over the city of the Mercenaries we saw a great captive war- balloon that burst even as we looked at it, and fell in flaming wreckage toward the earth.