wreckfish


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wreckfish

(ˈrɛkˌfɪʃ)
n, pl -fish or -fishes
(Animals) another name for stone bass
[so called because it is often found near wrecked ships]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wreckfish - brown fish of the Atlantic and Mediterranean found around rocks and shipwrecks
sea bass - any of various food and sport fishes of the Atlantic coast of the United States having an elongated body and long spiny dorsal fin
References in periodicals archive ?
patachonicus also differed from those of rough scad, cabrilla, and wreckfish (Polyprion americanus).
Polyprion americanus (Bloch & Schneider 1801), Wreckfish.
The wreckfish belongs to an ancestral group that gave rise millions of years ago to all the spiny rayed fishes we see today that numerically dominate fish species diversity in shallow coastal waters.
He dried the excess lemon balm to use as a marinade for local, line-caught, grilled Wreckfish, also known as Stone Bass.
locally known as pargo) and wreckfish, Polyprion americanus (locally known as cherne).
His menus currently lack the "fish we love down here," meaning snapper, grouper, and wreckfish, because prices are so high; instead, they feature a hodgepodge of wild species, such as tuna, mahimahi, and tilefish.
The fisheries analyzed were Alaska halibut, Alaska pollock, Alaska sablefish, Alaska king crab, mid-Atlantic surf clam and ocean quahog, South Atlantic wreckfish, Pacific whiting, British Columbia sablefish, British Columbia halibut, and British Columbia groundfish caught by trawling.
Description and Evaluation of the Wreckfish Fishery under Individual Transferable Quotas," by John Gauvin, John Ward, and Edward Burgess.
To assist in deliberations on individual fishing quota (IFQ) programs, GAO determined (1) the extent of consolidation of quota holdings in three IFQ programs (Alaskan halibut and sablefish, wreckfish, and surfclam/ocean quahog); (2) the extent of foreign holdings of quota in these programs; and (3) the economic effect of the IFQ program on Alaskan halibut and sablefish processors.
These regulate the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog fisheries,(10) the Wreckfish fishery,(11) and the Alaskan Halibut and Sablefish fisheries.
In the United States, ITQs manage the ocean quahog/surf clam, wreckfish, several Wisconsin Great Lake fisheries, several Pacific coast herring sac roe fisheries, and the Alaskan fixed gear sablefish and halibut fisheries.