wrest


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wrest

 (rĕst)
tr.v. wrest·ed, wrest·ing, wrests
1. To obtain or remove by pulling with twisting movements: wrested the book out of his hands.
2. To take possession of forcefully; seize or usurp: wrested the islands from the settlers; wrested power from the monarchy.
3. To gain or extract with persistent effort; wring: wrested concessions from their opponents.
n. Music
A small tuning key for the wrest pins of a stringed instrument.

[Middle English wresten, from Old English wrǣstan, to twist; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

wrest′er n.

wrest

(rɛst)
vb (tr)
1. to take or force away by violent pulling or twisting
2. to seize forcibly by violent or unlawful means
3. to obtain by laborious effort
4. to distort in meaning, purpose, etc
n
5. the act or an instance of wresting
6. (Instruments) archaic a small key used to tune a piano or harp
[Old English wrǣstan; related to Old Norse reista. See writhe]
ˈwrester n

wrest

(rɛst)
v.t.
1. to pull, jerk, or force by a violent twist.
2. to take away by force.
3. to get by effort: to wrest a living from the soil.
4. to twist or turn from the proper course, meaning, etc.; wrench.
n.
5. a wresting; twist or wrench.
6. a key or small wrench for tuning stringed musical instruments, as the harp or piano, by turning the pins to which the strings are fastened.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English wrǣstan, c. Icelandic reista] akin to wrist]
wrest′er, n.

wrest


Past participle: wrested
Gerund: wresting

Imperative
wrest
wrest
Present
I wrest
you wrest
he/she/it wrests
we wrest
you wrest
they wrest
Preterite
I wrested
you wrested
he/she/it wrested
we wrested
you wrested
they wrested
Present Continuous
I am wresting
you are wresting
he/she/it is wresting
we are wresting
you are wresting
they are wresting
Present Perfect
I have wrested
you have wrested
he/she/it has wrested
we have wrested
you have wrested
they have wrested
Past Continuous
I was wresting
you were wresting
he/she/it was wresting
we were wresting
you were wresting
they were wresting
Past Perfect
I had wrested
you had wrested
he/she/it had wrested
we had wrested
you had wrested
they had wrested
Future
I will wrest
you will wrest
he/she/it will wrest
we will wrest
you will wrest
they will wrest
Future Perfect
I will have wrested
you will have wrested
he/she/it will have wrested
we will have wrested
you will have wrested
they will have wrested
Future Continuous
I will be wresting
you will be wresting
he/she/it will be wresting
we will be wresting
you will be wresting
they will be wresting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been wresting
you have been wresting
he/she/it has been wresting
we have been wresting
you have been wresting
they have been wresting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been wresting
you will have been wresting
he/she/it will have been wresting
we will have been wresting
you will have been wresting
they will have been wresting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been wresting
you had been wresting
he/she/it had been wresting
we had been wresting
you had been wresting
they had been wresting
Conditional
I would wrest
you would wrest
he/she/it would wrest
we would wrest
you would wrest
they would wrest
Past Conditional
I would have wrested
you would have wrested
he/she/it would have wrested
we would have wrested
you would have wrested
they would have wrested
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.wrest - obtain by seizing forcibly or violently, also metaphorically; "wrest the knife from his hands"; "wrest a meaning from the old text"; "wrest power from the old government"
seize - take or capture by force; "The terrorists seized the politicians"; "The rebels threaten to seize civilian hostages"

wrest

verb
1. seize, take, win, extract He has been trying to wrest control from the central government.
2. pull, force, strain, seize, twist, extract, wrench, wring She wrested the suitcase from the chauffeur's grasp.

wrest

verb
1. To alter the position of by a sharp, forcible twisting or turning movement:
2. To obtain by coercion or intimidation:
Slang: shake down.
3. To give an inaccurate view of by representing falsely or misleadingly:
Idiom: give a false coloring to.
Translations
fravriste

wrest

[rest] VT to wrest sth from sbarrebatar or arrancar algo a algn
to wrest gold from the rocksextraer a duras penas oro de las rocas
to wrest a living from the soilvivir penosamente cultivando la tierra
to wrest o.s. free(lograr) liberarse tras grandes esfuerzos

wrest

[ˈrɛst] vt
(= seize) to wrest sth from sb [+ power, control] → arracher qch à qn
(= snatch) to wrest sth from sb [+ object] → arracher qch à qn

wrest

vt to wrest something from somebody/somethingjdm/einer Sache etw abringen; leadership, titlejdm etw entreißen; to wrest something from somebody’s graspjdm etw entreißen; to wrest oneself freesich losreißen

wrest

[rɛst] vt to wrest sth from sbstrappare qc a qn
References in classic literature ?
the fact that (opportunity aiding, precious opportunity which had now come) it would be preposterous, with a child so endowed, to forego the help one might wrest from absolute intelligence?
Having impulsively, it is probable, and perhaps somewhat prematurely revealed the prime but private purpose of the Pequod's voyage, Ahab was now entirely conscious that, in so doing, he had indirectly laid himself open to the unanswerable charge of usurpation; and with perfect impunity, both moral and legal, his crew if so disposed, and to that end competent, could refuse all further obedience to him, and even violently wrest from him the command.
Besides, this idea of Jonah's weathering the Cape of Good Hope at so early a day would wrest the honor of the discovery of that great headland from Bartholomew Diaz, its reputed discoverer, and so make modern history a liar.
Clare received a fatal stab in the side with a bowie-knife, which he was attempting to wrest from one of them.
As for me, I daily wished more to please him; but to do so, I felt daily more and more that I must disown half my nature, stifle half my faculties, wrest my tastes from their original bent, force myself to the adoption of pursuits for which I had no natural vocation.
He tried to wrest the key from Catherine's grasp, and for safety she flung it into the hottest part of the fire; whereupon Mr.
The Minstrel seemed of no vulgar rank; for, besides the splendour of his gaily braidered doublet, he wore around his neck a silver chain, by which hung the wrest, or key, with which he tuned his harp.
These, in their turn, cursed back at the blind miscreant, threatened him in horrid terms, and tried in vain to catch the stick and wrest it from his grasp.
Depend upon it when your master comes to be emperor (as he will beyond a doubt from the course his affairs are taking), it will be no easy matter to wrest the dignity from him, and he will be sore and sorry at heart to have been so long without becoming one.
In all very numerous assemblies, of whatever character composed, passion never fails to wrest the sceptre from reason.
The proletariat will use its political supremacy top wrest, by degrees, all capital from the bourgeoisie, to centralise all instruments of production in the hands of the State, i.
His love for my mother had never diminished, and his own ambition in life was to reach a point where he might wrest the metal from Tal Hajus himself, and thus, as ruler of the Tharks, be free to claim her as his own, as well as, by the might of his power, protect the child which otherwise would be quickly dispatched should the truth become known.