wretchedness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to wretchedness: preoccupied, impoverished

wretch·ed

 (rĕch′ĭd)
adj. wretch·ed·er, wretch·ed·est
1. In a deplorable state of distress or misfortune; miserable: "the wretched prisoners huddling in the stinking cages" (George Orwell).
2. Characterized by or attended with misery or woe: a wretched life.
3. Of a poor or mean character; dismal: a wretched building.
4. Contemptible; despicable: wretched treatment of the patients.
5. Of very inferior quality: wretched prose.

[Middle English wrecched, from wrecche, wretch; see wretch.]

wretch′ed·ly adv.
wretch′ed·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wretchedness - a state of ill-being due to affliction or misfortunewretchedness - a state of ill-being due to affliction or misfortune; "the misery and wretchedness of those slums is intolerable"
ill-being - lack of prosperity or happiness or health
concentration camp - a situation characterized by crowding and extremely harsh conditions
living death - a state of constant misery
woe, suffering - misery resulting from affliction
2.wretchedness - the character of being uncomfortable and unpleasant; "the wretchedness for which these prisons became known"; "the grey wretchedness of the rain"
discomfort, uncomfortableness - the state of being tense and feeling pain
3.wretchedness - the quality of being poor and inferior and sorry; "he has compiled a record second to none in its wretchedness"
low quality, inferiority - an inferior quality

wretchedness

noun
1. A state of physical or mental suffering:
2. A state of prolonged anguish and privation:
Translations
تَعاسَه، بُؤْس، شَقاء
elendighed
eymd

wretchedness

[ˈretʃɪdnɪs] N
1. (= unhappiness) → desdicha f
2. (= abjectness) [of conditions] → miseria f; [of life, existence] → desgracia f, infelicidad f; (= poverty) → miseria f

wretchedness

nErbärmlichkeit f; (of person: = misery) → Elend nt

wretchedness

[ˈrɛtʃɪdnɪs] n (of life, conditions, pay) → miseria; (unhappiness) → infelicità; (of behaviour, weather) → meschinità

wretch

(retʃ) noun
1. a miserable, unhappy creature. The poor wretch!
2. a name used in annoyance or anger. You wretch!
wretched (ˈretʃid) adjective
1. very poor or miserable. They live in a wretched little house.
2. used in annoyance. This wretched machine won't work!
ˈwretchedly adverb
ˈwretchedness noun
References in classic literature ?
Finding the great king beyond the water disappointed in his expectations, and conscious of the importance of the Long Knife, and their own wretchedness, some of the nations immediately desired peace; to which, at present, they seem universally disposed, and are sending ambassadors to General Clark, at the Falls of the Ohio, with the minutes of their Councils, a specimen of which, in the minutes of the Piankashaw Council, is subjoined.
The terror and ugliness of Maule's crime, and the wretchedness of his punishment, would darken the freshly plastered walls, and infect them early with the scent of an old and melancholy house.
When he came to himself, the fire was gone out, his clothes were wet with the chill and drenching dews; but the dread soul-crisis was past, and, in the joy that filled him, he no longer felt hunger, cold, degradation, disappointment, wretchedness.
On our way up we met the crowd returning--men and women dressed in all sorts of queer costumes, and exhibiting all degrees of cold and wretchedness in their gaits and countenances.
Poor Huck was in the same state of wretchedness and terror, for Tom had told the whole story to the lawyer the night before the great day of the trial, and Huck was sore afraid that his share in the business might leak out, yet, notwithstanding Injun Joe's flight had saved him the suffering of testifying in court.
Ex- perience is a keen teacher; and long before you had mastered your A B C, or knew where the "white sails" of the Chesapeake were bound, you began, I see, to gauge the wretchedness of the slave, not by his hunger and want, not by his lashes and toil, but by the cruel and blighting death which gathers over his soul.
I do not think it will," stopping to look once more at all the outward wretchedness of the place, and recall the still greater within.
They gave themselves up wholly to their sorrow, seeking increase of wretchedness in every reflection that could afford it, and resolved against ever admitting consolation in future.
I felt physically weak and broken down: but my worse ailment was an unutterable wretchedness of mind: a wretchedness which kept drawing from me silent tears; no sooner had I wiped one salt drop from my cheek than another followed.
I sobbed; I was beyond regarding self- respect, weighed down by fatigue and wretchedness.
On reaching the passage, he looked through the open door of his little parlor and saw Frank sitting there in idle wretchedness, with his head resting wearily on his hand.
I passed three days in a luxury of wretchedness, torturing myself by putting every conceivable variety of discouraging construction on all that ever had taken place between Dora and me.