wristband


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wrist·band

 (rĭst′bănd′)
n.
A band, as on a long sleeve or a wristwatch, that encircles the wrist.

wristband

(ˈrɪstˌbænd)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a band around the wrist, esp one attached to a watch or forming part of a long sleeve
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a sweatband around the wrist

wrist•band

(ˈrɪstˌbænd)

n.
1. the band of a sleeve that covers the wrist; cuff.
2. a strap attached to a wristwatch and worn around the wrist.
3. a cloth band worn on the wrist to absorb perspiration.
[1565–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wristband - band consisting of a part of a sleeve that covers the wrist
band - a thin flat strip of flexible material that is worn around the body or one of the limbs (especially to decorate the body)
sleeve, arm - the part of a garment that is attached at the armhole and that provides a cloth covering for the arm
2.wristband - a band of cloth or leather or metal links attached to a wristwatch and wrapped around the wristwristband - a band of cloth or leather or metal links attached to a wristwatch and wrapped around the wrist
band - a thin flat strip of flexible material that is worn around the body or one of the limbs (especially to decorate the body)
Translations

wristband

[ˈrɪstbænd] N [of shirt] → puño m; [of watch] → pulsera f (Sport) → muñequera f

wristband

[ˈrɪstbænd] n
[watch] → bracelet m
(for identification)bracelet m
(= bracelet) (leather, cotton)bracelet m
[shirt] → poignet mwrist-rest [ˈrɪstrɛst] nrepose-poignets m, repose-poignet m

wristband

[ˈrɪstˌbænd] n (of shirt) → polsino; (of watch) → cinturino
References in classic literature ?
Their voluminousness of wristband, with an air of excessive frankness, should betray them at once.
It is just so with your buttons: you let them burst off without telling me, and go out with your wristband hanging.
Gentleman Jones, not in the least altered or ruffled, smoothed down his wristbands, smiled, and walked away.
A narrow belt held it at the waist and the sleeves were gathered into close fitting wristbands.
Broad-brimmed white hats and Panamas, blue-cotton trousers, light-colored stockings, cambric frills, were all here displayed; while upon shirt-fronts, wristbands, and neckties, upon every finger, even upon the very ears, they wore an assortment of rings, shirt-pins, brooches, and trinkets, of which the value only equaled the execrable taste.
The truth is, I came to the gate, where some dozen or so of devils were playing tennis, all in breeches and doublets, with falling collars trimmed with Flemish bonelace, and ruffles of the same that served them for wristbands, with four fingers' breadth of the arms exposed to make their hands look longer; in their hands they held rackets of fire; but what amazed me still more was that books, apparently full of wind and rubbish, served them for tennis balls, a strange and marvellous thing; this, however, did not astonish me so much as to observe that, although with players it is usual for the winners to be glad and the losers sorry, there in that game all were growling, all were snarling, and all were cursing one another.
The breast of his coat was ornamented with an outside pocket from which there peeped forth the cleanest end of a very large and very ill-favoured handkerchief; his dirty wristbands were pulled on as far as possible and ostentatiously folded back over his cuffs; he displayed no gloves, and carried a yellow cane having at the top a bone hand with the semblance of a ring on its little finger and a black ball in its grasp.
They starched two hundred white shirts, with a single gathering movement seizing a shirt so that the wristbands, neckband, yoke, and bosom protruded beyond the circling right hand.
Bolder,' said Squeers, tucking up his wristbands, and moistening the palm of his right hand to get a good grip of the cane, 'you're an incorrigible young scoundrel, and as the last thrashing did you no good, we must see what another will do towards beating it out of you.
Howbeit, Twemlow doth at length invest himself with collar and cravat and wristbands to his knuckles, and goeth forth to breakfast.
Tupman, speaking in a voice tremulous with emotion, and tucking up his wristbands meanwhile, 'is great--very great--but upon that person, I must take summary vengeance.
Miss Meg March, one letter and a glove," continued Beth, delivering the articles to her sister, who sat near her mother, stitching wristbands.