wristband


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wrist·band

 (rĭst′bănd′)
n.
A band, as on a long sleeve or a wristwatch, that encircles the wrist.

wristband

(ˈrɪstˌbænd)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a band around the wrist, esp one attached to a watch or forming part of a long sleeve
2. (Clothing & Fashion) a sweatband around the wrist

wrist•band

(ˈrɪstˌbænd)

n.
1. the band of a sleeve that covers the wrist; cuff.
2. a strap attached to a wristwatch and worn around the wrist.
3. a cloth band worn on the wrist to absorb perspiration.
[1565–75]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.wristband - band consisting of a part of a sleeve that covers the wrist
band - a thin flat strip of flexible material that is worn around the body or one of the limbs (especially to decorate the body)
sleeve, arm - the part of a garment that is attached at the armhole and that provides a cloth covering for the arm
2.wristband - a band of cloth or leather or metal links attached to a wristwatch and wrapped around the wristwristband - a band of cloth or leather or metal links attached to a wristwatch and wrapped around the wrist
band - a thin flat strip of flexible material that is worn around the body or one of the limbs (especially to decorate the body)
Translations

wristband

[ˈrɪstbænd] N [of shirt] → puño m; [of watch] → pulsera f (Sport) → muñequera f

wristband

[ˈrɪstbænd] n
[watch] → bracelet m
(for identification)bracelet m
(= bracelet) (leather, cotton)bracelet m
[shirt] → poignet mwrist-rest [ˈrɪstrɛst] nrepose-poignets m, repose-poignet m

wristband

[ˈrɪstˌbænd] n (of shirt) → polsino; (of watch) → cinturino
References in classic literature ?
Their voluminousness of wristband, with an air of excessive frankness, should betray them at once.
It is just so with your buttons: you let them burst off without telling me, and go out with your wristband hanging.
She read so eagerly and constantly in her three books, the Bible, Thomas a Kempis, and the "Christian Year" (no longer rejected as a "hymn-book"), that they filled her mind with a continual stream of rhythmic memories; and she was too ardently learning to see all nature and life in the light of her new faith, to need any other material for her mind to work on, as she sat with her well-plied needle, making shirts and other complicated stitchings, falsely called "plain,"--by no means plain to Maggie, since wristband and sleeve and the like had a capability of being sewed in wrong side outward in moments of mental wandering.
Miss Meg March, one letter and a glove," continued Beth, delivering the articles to her sister, who sat near her mother, stitching wristbands.
A narrow belt held it at the waist and the sleeves were gathered into close fitting wristbands.
Tom, therefore, in his well-brushed broadcloth suit, smooth beaver, glossy boots, faultless wristbands and collar, with his grave, good-natured black face, looked respectable enough to be a Bishop of Carthage, as men of his color were, in other ages.
Here, in gold-embroidered red doublet, jewelled surcoat, and gilt-edged ruff and wristbands, stood Sir Anthony Sherard, with his silver-and-black armour piled at his feet.
The truth is, I came to the gate, where some dozen or so of devils were playing tennis, all in breeches and doublets, with falling collars trimmed with Flemish bonelace, and ruffles of the same that served them for wristbands, with four fingers' breadth of the arms exposed to make their hands look longer; in their hands they held rackets of fire; but what amazed me still more was that books, apparently full of wind and rubbish, served them for tennis balls, a strange and marvellous thing; this, however, did not astonish me so much as to observe that, although with players it is usual for the winners to be glad and the losers sorry, there in that game all were growling, all were snarling, and all were cursing one another.
The curtain at length fell on the performances, to the infinite satisfaction of the Viscount of Morcerf, who seized his hat, rapidly passed his fingers through his hair, arranged his cravat and wristbands, and signified to Franz that he was waiting for him to lead the way.
He had a cane, he had an eye-glass, he had a snuff-box, he had rings, he had wristbands, he had everything but any touch of nature; he was not like youth, he was not like age, he was not like anything in the world but a model of deportment.
She made this apology to a gentleman in black, who, with his wristbands tucked up, and his hat cocked loungingly on one side, and his hands in his pockets, sat down astride on the table-beer barrel, and nodded in return.
They starched two hundred white shirts, with a single gathering movement seizing a shirt so that the wristbands, neckband, yoke, and bosom protruded beyond the circling right hand.