write off


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write

 (rīt)
v. wrote (rōt), writ·ten (rĭt′n) also writ (rĭt), writ·ing, writes
v.tr.
1.
a. To form (letters, words, or symbols) on a surface such as paper with an instrument such as a pen.
b. To form (letters or words) in cursive style, especially in contrast to printing by hand.
c. To spell: How do you write your name?
2.
a. To fill (an amount of space) with words or information: wrote five pages in an hour.
b. To put written information in the blank spaces of (a check, form, or similar document).
3.
a. To produce or compose (text) in a recorded form that can be read: write a poem; write a letter.
b. To express in writing; set down: write one's thoughts.
c. To communicate by writing, especially by written letter: She wrote that she was planning to visit.
d. To communicate with (someone) by writing, especially by letter: wrote me to tell me she had moved again.
4. To compose (a musical work).
5.
a. To underwrite, as an insurance policy.
b. To compose in legal form; draft: write a will.
6. To indicate; mark: "Utter dejection was written on every face" (Winston S. Churchill).
7. To ordain or prophesy: It was written that the empire would fall.
8. Computers To transfer or copy (information) from memory to a storage device or output device.
v.intr.
1. To trace or form letters, words, or symbols on paper or another surface: people who cannot read or write.
2. To produce written material, such as articles or books: She wrote for most of her adult life.
3. To compose a letter, email, or other written communication: Please write while you are away.
Phrasal Verbs:
write down
1. To set down in writing.
2. Accounting To record a reduced value for (an asset): forced to write down a security after a fall in its market value.
3. Accounting To record (a loss) by reducing the value of an asset: wrote down $10 million in bad debt.
4. To write in a conspicuously simple or condescending style: felt he had to write down to his students.
5. To disparage in writing: a film that was written down in the magazine.
write in
1. To cast a vote by inserting (a name not listed on a ballot).
2. To insert in a text or document: wrote in an apology at the end of the note.
3. To communicate with an organization by mail: write in with a completed entry form.
write off
1. Accounting To record (a worthless asset) as a loss.
2. Accounting To record (a loss or expense) as a reduction in earnings or in the value of an asset: wrote off business expenses when calculating taxable income.
3. To consider as a loss or failure: wrote off the rainy first day of the vacation.
4. To disregard as inconsequential: wrote off the singer as a novelty act.
write out
1. To express or compose in writing: write out a request.
2. To write in full or expanded form: All abbreviations are to be written out.
write up
1. To write a report or description of, as for publication.
2. Accounting To record an increased value for (an asset).
3. To report (someone) in writing, as for breaking the law: wrote him up for speeding.
4. To bring (a journal, for example) up to date.
Idioms:
write (one's) own ticket
To set one's own terms or course of action entirely according to one's own needs or wishes: an open-ended and generous scholarship that lets recipients write their own ticket.
write the book on
To be the preeminent practitioner of or expert in (something).
writ large
Signified, expressed, or embodied in a greater or more prominent magnitude or degree: "The man was no more than the boy writ large" (George Eliot).

[Middle English writen, from Old English wrītan.]
Word History: Every modern Indo-European language of Western Europe except English derives its verb for "to write" from Latin scrībere: French écrire, Spanish escribir, Portuguese escrever, Catalan escriure, Italian scrivere, Irish scríobh, Scottish Gaelic sgrìobh, Welsh ysgrifennu, Breton skriva, Icelandic skrifa, Danish and Norwegian skrive, Swedish skriva, German schreiben, and Dutch schrijven. The English verb write, however, comes from Old English wrītan, from the Germanic root *writ- that in turn comes from the Indo-European root *wreid- meaning "to cut, scratch, tear, sketch an outline." German still retains this meaning in its cognate verb reissen, "to tear." Only Old English employed wrītan to refer to writing—that is, scratching on parchment with a pen. English shows a similar contrariness in its verb read, being almost the only western European language not to derive that verb from Latin legere.

write off

vb (tr, adverb)
1. (Accounting & Book-keeping) accounting
a. to cancel (a bad debt or obsolete asset) from the accounts
b. to consider (a transaction, etc) as a loss or set off (a loss) against revenues
c. to depreciate (an asset) by periodic charges
d. to charge (a specified amount) against gross profits as depreciation of an asset
2. to cause or acknowledge the complete loss of
3. (Commerce) to send a written order for (something): she wrote off for a brochure.
4. (Automotive Engineering) informal to damage (something, esp a car) beyond repair
n
5. (Accounting & Book-keeping) accounting
a. the act of cancelling a bad debt or obsolete asset from the accounts
b. the bad debt or obsolete asset cancelled
c. the amount cancelled against gross profits, corresponding to the book value of the bad debt or obsolete asset
6. (Automotive Engineering) informal something damaged beyond repair, esp a car
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.write off - concede the loss or worthlessness of something or somebody; "write it off as a loss"
acknowledge, admit - declare to be true or admit the existence or reality or truth of; "He admitted his errors"; "She acknowledged that she might have forgotten"
2.write off - write something fluently, and without hesitation
indite, pen, write, compose - produce a literary work; "She composed a poem"; "He wrote four novels"
3.write off - cancel (a debt)
strike down, cancel - declare null and void; make ineffective; "Cancel the election results"; "strike down a law"
4.write off - reduce the estimated value of something; "For tax purposes you can write off the laser printer"
depreciate - lower the value of something; "The Fed depreciated the dollar once again"
Translations

w>write off

vt sep
(= write quickly)(schnell) hinschreiben; essay, poemherunterschreiben
debt, lossesabschreiben; (fig: = regard as failure) → abschreiben; don’t write him off just yetschreib ihn noch nicht ganz ab
car etc (driver) → zu Schrott fahren (inf); (insurance company) → als Totalschaden abschreiben
References in classic literature ?
But if the task were, not to write off the English Bible, but to learn a language utterly unlike all other tongues, a language which hitherto had never been learned, except by the Indians themselves, from their mothers' lips,--a language never written, and the strange words of which seemed inexpressible by letters,--if the task were, first to learn this new variety of speech, and then to translate the Bible into it, and to do it so carefully that not one idea throughout the holy book should be changed,--what would induce you to undertake this toil?
The owners write off twenty per cent of the cost of their schooners each year.
The Finance Ministry's Revenues Administration (GyB) released its tax revenue figures for 2013 on Wednesday, showing that the ministry had agreed to write off tax fines levied on 68 separate cases in 2013.
Since April 2013 we share the impact of write offs - 50% central government, 1% for the Fire Authority and 49% for the council.
Coun Tebbutt added: "We only write off debts when all other avenues have been explored and we have to make a judgement on whether it is worth pursuing.
In this environment, it is prudent to write off loans that have refinanced.
The council eventually seized the businessman's property in Station Road to recover pounds 20,000 but the Plaid Cymru-run cabinet agreed to write off the pounds 38,000 balance after officers said they were unable to track the debtor down.
Bahrain-based Arab Banking Corporation (ABC) said on Sunday that it did not reach an agreement with Kuwait's International Leasing and Investment Company (ILIC) to write off debt.
Investigations of write offs in Pakistan reveal some interesting facts.
Citing unnamed sources, the report said that the building society will write off around EUR70m in losses for development finance, EUR15m for investment in Iceland and another EUR15m for miscellaneous losses.
The debt write off is consistent with the Paris Club Agreement on January 14, 2004 and the UK Debt Relief Policy.
In their lawsuit, Michael and Marla Sklar contend the IRS erred by disallowing their tax deduction while permitting members of the Church of Scientology to write off the cost of spiritual counseling and instruction on that religion's tenets.