wronged


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wrong

 (rông, rŏng)
adj.
1. Not in conformity with fact or truth; incorrect or erroneous: a wrong answer.
2.
a. Contrary to conscience, morality, or law: Stealing is wrong.
b. Unfair; unjust: The kids felt it was wrong when some got to go on the field trip but not others.
3. Not required, intended, or wanted: took a wrong turn.
4. Not fitting or suitable; inappropriate or improper: said the wrong thing.
5. Not in accord with established usage, method, or procedure: the wrong way to shuck clams.
6. Not functioning properly; amiss: What is wrong with the TV?
7. Designating the side, as of a garment, that is less finished and not intended to show: socks worn wrong side out.
adv.
1. In a wrong manner; mistakenly or erroneously: answered wrong.
2. In a wrong course or direction: turned wrong at the crossroads.
3. Immorally or unjustly: She acted wrong in lying.
n.
1.
a. An unjust, injurious, or immoral act: felt that he had been done a wrong.
b. That which is unjust, immoral, or improper: doesn't seem to know right from wrong.
c. The condition of being in error or at fault: I hate being in the wrong.
2.
a. An invasion or a violation of another's legal rights.
b. Law A tort.
tr.v. wronged, wrong·ing, wrongs
1. To treat (someone) unjustly or injuriously.
2. To discredit unjustly; malign: "those whom he had wronged with his bitter pen" (Evan I. Schwartz).
Idioms:
do (someone) wrong Informal
To be unfaithful or disloyal.
go wrong
1. To go amiss; turn out badly: What went wrong with their business?
2. To make a mistake or mistakes: parents wondering where they went wrong raising their child.
3. To behave immorally after a period of innocence or moral behavior: a young man who went wrong.

[Middle English, of Scandinavian origin; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

wrong′er n.
wrong′ly adv.
wrong′ness n.

wronged

(rɔŋd, rɒŋd)

adj.
treated unfairly or unjustly.
[1540–50]
References in classic literature ?
To us it is incomprehensible that millions of Christian men killed and tortured each other either because Napoleon was ambitious or Alexander was firm, or because England's policy was astute or the Duke of Oldenburg wronged.
Now Dreyfus went on like a man who knew he was a wronged man.
You will wonder, perhaps,' she said in a stronger tone, 'that I can better bear to be known to you whom I have wronged, than to the son of my enemy who wronged me.