wrung


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wrung

 (rŭng)
v.
Past tense and past participle of wring.

wrung

(rʌŋ)
vb
the past tense and past participle of wring

wring

(rɪŋ)

v. wrung, wring•ing, v.t.
1. to twist forcibly: She wrung the chicken's neck.
2. to twist or compress in order to force out water or other liquid (often fol. by out): to wring out a washcloth.
3. to extract by or as if by twisting or compression: to wring a confession from a spy.
4. to affect painfully by or as if by some contorting or compressing action.
5. to clasp tightly, usu. with twisting: to wring one's hands in pain.
v.i.
6. to writhe, as in anguish.
n.
7. a wringing; forcible twist or squeeze.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English wringan, c. Old Saxon wringan]
Translations

wring

(riŋ) past tense, past participle wrung (raŋ) verb
1. to force (water) from (material) by twisting or by pressure. He wrung the water from his soaking-wet shirt.
2. to clasp and unclasp (one's hands) in desperation, fear etc.
ˈwringer noun
a machine for forcing water from wet clothes.
wringing wet
soaked through. The clothes are wringing wet; wringing-wet clothes.
References in classic literature ?
I was about to make some further observations, but he wrung my hand warmly and wished me good-bye.
She wrung her hands, and crushed her white hair, and returned to this cry over and over again.
Strange that Creation, designed expressly for Monseigneur, should be so soon wrung dry and squeezed out
Out of that tub had come the day before--Tess felt it with a dreadful sting of remorse--the very white frock upon her back which she had so carelessly greened about the skirt on the damping grass--which had been wrung up and ironed by her mother's own hands.
And poor Rose wrung her hands at the awful prospect before her.
Then the mother wrung her hands, sang and wept, and there were many songs, but yet many more tears; and then Night said, "Go to the right, into the dark pine forest; thither I saw Death take his way with thy little child
he almost shrieked, as he wrung his hands, 'won't anybody give me comfort
Lecount's questions on the subject of her letter -- the answers wrung from her under the sudden pressure of confusion and alarm -- may be used to Magdalen's prejudice by the woman who purposely startled her into giving the information.
The words were wrung from him, and he did not know he had spoken.