x-ray crystallography


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

x-ray crystallography

n.
The study of crystal structure by means of x-ray diffraction.

X-ray crystallography

n
(General Physics) the study and practice of determining the structure of a crystal by passing a beam of X-rays through it and observing and analysing the diffraction pattern produced
References in periodicals archive ?
X-Ray crystallography is the technique which led to the discovery of the double helix structure of DNA.
In this market analysis, analysts have estimated the X-ray crystallography segment to be the largest market segment during the forecast period.
Data from analytical techniques, including mass spectrometry, X-ray crystallography and infrared spectroscopy, can be used to determine the structure of organic molecules, often using evidence from more than one technique (ACSCH130).
Scientists from a wide variety of disciplines are employing X-ray crystallography.
The results are the first X-ray crystallography studies showing how a neuropeptide agonist binds to neuropeptide GPCRs.
The SMART X2S benchtop X-ray crystallography system is suited for fully automated 3-D chemical structure determination.
Oxford Diffraction, of which Oxford Instruments held a 23% stake, develops and manufactures x-ray crystallography instrumentation for pharmaceutical research.
Fragment-based drug discovery is a method of drug design by selecting small molecular weight compounds (fragments) which interact with specific sites of the target protein and subsequent linkage and modification of the fragments utilizing protein X-ray crystallography.
Traditional imaging techniques based on light microscopy do not offer sufficient resolution to see how cellular molecules and small structures interact in actual life, and powerful techniques such as x-ray crystallography can define only the structure of an individual molecule or simple molecular interactions.
In Chapters 2 and 3, X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy tools that structural biologists use to study the detailed shapes of proteins and other biological molecules are described.
This book is enjoyable to read, is extensively referenced, and has 52 superb structural models in full color, based in part on x-ray crystallography.
Russell says his laboratory will be working with approximately 20 other groups in Europe to embark on a variety of further experiments using tools including electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography.