xanthate

(redirected from xanthates)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to xanthates: sodium xanthate

xan·thate

 (zăn′thāt′)
n.
A salt or ester of a xanthic acid, especially a simple xanthic acid salt, as of sodium or potassium, used as a flotation collector for copper, silver, and gold.

xanthate

(ˈzænθeɪt)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any salt or ester of xanthic acid
xanˈthation n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.xanthate - a salt or ester of xanthic acid
cellulose xanthate, viscose - a cellulose ester obtained by treating cellulose with caustic soda
salt - a compound formed by replacing hydrogen in an acid by a metal (or a radical that acts like a metal)
Translations
ksantaatti
References in periodicals archive ?
Xanthates (dithiocarbonate) were used as collector for flotation of galena and sphalerite minerals instead of less powerful Aero floats (dithiophosphates).
I n powder and pellet form, xanthates have been an industry staple for the collection of sulfide minerals for more than 90 years.
In 1924 Keller, working for the Minerals Separation Company, patented the use of less than one per cent of a soluble organic compound, particularly the xanthates, as a mineral flotation reagent.
Lai, JT, Shea, R, "Controlled Radical Polymerization by Carboxyl- and Hydroxyl-Terminated Dithiocarbamates and Xanthates.
Processing of metal ores typically involves the addition of chemicals such as sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, sodium cyanide, copper sulfate, sulfur dioxide, xanthates, diesel oil, amines, polypropylene glycol methyl ether, and dozens more.
Other subjects explored include macromolecule design by interchange of xanthates, surface and particle modification via the RAFT process, and new materials prepared via the RAFT process.
Cytec's 5000-series promoters, introduced in the early 1990s, have gained solid market acceptance because of their improvement in metallurgical performance and selectivity at lower alkalinities than xanthates, allowing significant reductions in lime consumption.
Furthermore, cure systems containing xanthates could enable vulcanization over a broader range of temperatures.
The company's sulphide collectors include xanthates, thiocarbamates, mercaptobenzothiazoles, mercaptans, dithiophosphates, dithiocarbamates and tailored reagents, while its non-sulphide collectors include fatty acids, ether amines, ether diamines, fatty amines, sulphosuccinamates and modified fatty acids.
Gishler's research covered a wide number of activities including the pyrolysis of natural gas, the chemistry of wood pulping, the development of refractories from natural mineral deposits, the purification of silver, gold, uranium and sodium sulfate from natural deposits, the purification of cooling water for atomic reactors, and the manufacture of pentaerythritol, alkyl xanthates, and solid formaldehyde, for example.