xenogenesis


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xen·o·gen·e·sis

 (zĕn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs, zē′nə-)
n.
The supposed production of offspring markedly different from either parent.

xen′o·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk), xen′o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.

xenogenesis

(ˌzɛnəˈdʒɛnɪsɪs) or

xenogeny

n
1. (Biology) the supposed production of offspring completely unlike either parent
2. (Biology) another name for abiogenesis, alternation of generations
xenogenetic, ˌxenoˈgenic adj

xen•o•gen•e•sis

(ˌzɛn əˈdʒɛn ə sɪs, ˌzi nə-)

also xe•nog•e•ny

(zəˈnɒdʒ ə ni)

n.
2. the supposed generation of offspring completely and permanently different from the parent.
[1865–70]
xen`o•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) xen`o•gen′ic, adj.

xenogenesis, xenogeny

1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. — xenogenetic, xenogenic, adj.
See also: Biology
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny.xenogenic, — xenogenetic, adj.
See also: Organisms
1. abiogenesis; spontaneous generation.
2. metagenesis, or alternation of generations.
3. production of an offspring entirely different from either of the parents. Also xenogeny. — xenogenic, xenogenetic, adj.
See also: Heredity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.xenogenesis - the alternation of two or more different forms in the life cycle of a plant or animal
organic phenomenon - (biology) a natural phenomenon involving living plants and animals
digenesis, metagenesis - alternation of sexual and asexual generations
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the frame of Afrofuturist sonic reference could extend to easily encompass the nonagenarian Egyptian composer Halitn El-Dabh, recognized as the "father of African electronic music," or AACM composer and flutist Nicole Mitchell's Xenogenesis Suite (2008), based on the work of Octa-via Butler.
Michella Erica Green in her analysis of Octavia Butler's XENOGENESIS trilogy maintains that Butler's works "border on the dystopian because she insists on confronting problems that have occurred so often in human communities that they seem almost an unavoidable part of human nature" (qtd in Jim Miller 339).
Here the alien-human congress is explored in essays on Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy, miscegenation in science fiction TV and film, colonialism in Star Trek, and preoedipal development in Primo Levi's science fiction.
Broad draws on romanticism and postcolonialism in "Body Speaks: Communication and the Limits of Nationalism in Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy" to examine ideas of language, communication, and colonial discourses in Butler.
The first of these two essays, by Theodora Goss and Riquelme, is an exploration of a concept they call the "Technological Imaginary," which signifies a key trope of Gothic science fiction, through a comparative analysis of Mary Shelley's seminal Gothic text Frankenstein (1818), and, at the other end of our timeline, Octavia Butler's science fiction trilogy, Xenogenesis (now marketed as Lilith's Brood, 2000).
Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy (1987-89) aliens seek to interbreed with the survivors of a nuclear war to remove a conflict between humanity's genetic traits: intelligence and hierarchical thinking.
In books such as the Patternist novels, published from 1976 to 1984, and the Xenogenesis trilogy, published from 1987 to 1989 and now collected in the omnibus volume Lilith's Brood, Butler employed the stuff of hard science--biological engineering, interspecies hybrids--to create settings and situations that are both literally and figuratively alien.
51) In the chapter's explosive final subsection, 'Reading Science Fiction as Primatology: Xenogenesis and Feminism,' Haraway examines, or as she puts it, 'perversely reads,' volume one of Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy, the science/speculative fiction story entitled Dawn: Xenogenesis (1987), as though it were a monograph from the modern primate field.
She and her Bebington business partner Barbara Davies, also a teacher and a mother,have set up Xenogenesis,a company specialising in courses looking at emotional health and improving communication.
To take two examples from her eight main chapters, under "immigration" she discusses Russell Banks's Continental Drift to establish that immigration is a global phenomenon, next includes Maxine Hong Kingston and Amy Tan to examine the gender dimension, and finally turns to Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy.
From the Medusa-like appearance of the alien Oankali in her Xenogenesis Trilogy(1) and the archetypal power of the matriarchal shapeshifter Anyanwu in her 1980 novel Wild Seed to Gan's "female" reproductive function for the Tlic in "Bloodchild," Butler is deeply invested in science-fictional metaphors for the "feminine" which challenge traditional representations.
The fourth chapter focuses on Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy (Dawn [1987], Adulthood Rites [1988], and Imago [1989]), considers the black body's survival capacity in terms of race and gender, and re-envisions identity boundaries.