xylitol


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xy·li·tol

 (zī′lĭ-tôl′, -tōl′, -tŏl′)
n.
A sweet white crystalline alcohol derived from xylose, C5H12O5, used in gum and oral health products to inhibit bacteria that cause caries and as a dietary sugar substitute.

xylitol

(ˈzaɪlɪˌtɒl)
n
1. (Cookery) chem an artificial sweetener produced from xylose and used esp in chewing gum. Formula: CH2HOH(CHOH)3CH2OH
2. (Chemistry) chem an artificial sweetener produced from xylose and used esp in chewing gum. Formula: CH2HOH(CHOH)3CH2OH
[C19: from xyl(ose) + -ite2 + -ol1]

xy•li•tol

(ˈzaɪ lɪˌtɔl, -ˌtɒl)

n.
a naturally occurring pentose sugar alcohol, C5H12O5, used as a sugar substitute.
[< German Xylit (1891)]
Translations
Xylitol
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References in periodicals archive ?
The "historical" object of this field project was to evaluate the influence of maternal xylitol consumption on the motherchild transmission of MS and caries development in the mothers' children.
Xylitol Canada Inc (TSX VENTURE:XYL), a company that markets xylitol and xylitol-based products, has announced its financial and operating results for the six months ended June 30, 2012.
The Louis Garneau Carbon Pro Team shoes, designed for cycling, use the sweetener xylitol, more commonly found in gum and toothpaste.
Xylitol is currently produced on an industrial scale by a catalytic reduction (hydrogenation) of xylose obtained from wood sources such as white birches.
Thanks to its versatility, as well as its dental and diabetic health benefits, xylitol is attracting the attention of many of today's consumers and product developers.
Arbor Pharmaceuticals has launched xylitol (Xylarex) oral solution for the dietary management of recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) in children.
Implementations may include liquefying the hydrolyzed cellulose stream to form a raw sugars stream, separating xylitol from the raw sugars stream and fermenting the sugars stream to form a raw ethanol stream by reacting the sugars stream with a yeast feed in at least one fermenter.
The company, which manufactures xylitol products, says the change will reduce employee gas consumption by 20 percent and enable the company to reduce its energy consumption required to light, cool and heat its offices, as well as operate equipment.
According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (888-426-4435), xylitol can cause a rapid drop in blood sugar that results in weakness, loss of coordination, and seizures in just half an hour.
A new, multi-purpose cooking and depositing system developed by Baker Perkins for sugar-free hard candy, and candy/crystallized Xylitol composite products brings new possibilities to the market.
The natural sugar alternative releases its energy very slowly when it is digested and studies have shown those that swap sugar for xylitol go on to eat less calories during the day.
Ingredients, such as Litesse (polydextrose), lactitol and xylitol, were once perceived as occupying a niche market for diabetic or sugar-free products.