xylophone

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xy·lo·phone

 (zī′lə-fōn′)
n.
A percussion instrument consisting of a mounted row of wooden bars that are graduated in length to sound a chromatic scale, played with two small mallets.

xy′lo·phon′ist n.
Word History: Alphabet books for children frequently feature the word xylophone because it is one of the few words beginning with x that a child (or most adults, for that matter) would know. The majority of English words beginning with x, including many obscure scientific terms, go back to one of five Greek words: xanthos, "yellow," xenos, "stranger," xēros, "dry," xiphos, "sword," or xulon, "wood." The initial x, representing the Greek letter xi, is now pronounced (z) in English even though it was pronounced (ks) by the Greeks. (It seems that at first, the initial x in English words of Greek origin was pronounced as (gz), like the x in exist, and at some point, (gz) was simplified to the (z) heard today.) In the case of xylophone, xylo- is derived from Greek xulon and -phone represents Greek phōnē, "voice, sound," the same element found in words such as telephone, microphone, and megaphone. Different forms of the xylophone have long been important instruments in many musical traditions, such as those of Africa and Southeast Asia, but in Europe, xylophones remained a minor instrument used mostly in the folk music of Eastern Europe. In the Renaissance depictions of the Dance of Death, however, skeletons are often shown merrily playing on xylophonelike instruments. These instruments were called by various names in Europe over the centuries, but the English term xylophone (along with its relatives in other European languages like French xylophone and German Xylophon) appears to be a creation of the 1800s. In the 1830s, the Russian Jewish xylophone virtuoso Michal Josef Gusikov (1806-1837) toured Europe and created a sensation in Paris and Vienna by playing on something that was introduced to the audience as a wood-and-straw instrument. Thereafter, xylophonelike instruments steadily gained in popularity in Western Europe. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first known attestation of our modern name for the instrument is found in the following description from the April 7, 1866, edition of Athenaeum, a British literary magazine: "A prodigy ... who does wonderful things with little drumsticks on a machine of wooden keys, called the 'xylophone.'" Soon after, in 1874, the French composer Camille Saint-Saëns famously included a part for the xylophone in his Danse Macabre, a musical depiction of the Dance of Death.

xylophone

(ˈzaɪləˌfəʊn)
n
(Instruments) music a percussion instrument consisting of a set of wooden bars of graduated length. It is played with hard-headed hammers
[C19: from xylo- + -phone]
xylophonic adj
xylophonist n

xy•lo•phone

art at xylophagous
(ˈzaɪ ləˌfoʊn)

n.
a musical instrument consisting of a graduated series of wooden bars, usu. sounded by striking with small wooden hammers.
[1865–70]
xy′lo•phon`ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.xylophone - a percussion instrument with wooden bars tuned to produce a chromatic scale and with resonatorsxylophone - a percussion instrument with wooden bars tuned to produce a chromatic scale and with resonators; played with small mallets
percussion instrument, percussive instrument - a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by one object striking another
Translations
زايلفونزيلوفون: آلة موسيقيَّهسَيْليفُون
xylofon
xylofon
ksylofoni
ksilofon
xilofon
tréspil, sílófónn
シロホン木琴
실로폰
xylophonium
ksilofonas
ksilofons
xylofón
ksilofon
xylofon
ระนาดฝรั่ง
ksilafonksilofonvurmalı çalgı
mộc cầm

xylophone

[ˈzaɪləfəʊn] Nxilófono m

xylophone

[ˈzaɪləfəʊn] nxylophone m
to play the xylophone → jouer du xylophone

xylophone

nXylofon nt

xylophone

(ˈzailəfəun) noun
a musical instrument consisting of wooden or metal slats of various lengths, which produce different notes when struck by wooden hammers.

xylophone

سَيْليفُون xylofon xylofon Xylophon ξυλόφωνο xilófono ksylofoni xylophone ksilofon xilofono シロホン 실로폰 xylofoon xylofon ksylofon xilofone ксилофон xylofon ระนาดฝรั่ง ksilofon mộc cầm 木琴
References in periodicals archive ?
It is made by group members on xylophones and accompanying instruments such as maracas, tambourines and even a ute.
In addition to a variety of percussion instruments, including xylophones, gongs, snare drums, and tablas, the ensemble also has pianists, violinists, cellists, bassists, and violists.
Pulsating beats ignited into a cacophony of crashing cymbals, pinging xylophones and halo worthy angelic harmonies.
The tastefully quirky, orchestral pop songs on the band's third album contain all manner of strings and xylophones and mouthfuls of big words (genuflect
Associated with the Big Apple's "antifolk" scene, her sophisticated sound is produced with acoustic guitars, pianos, organs, harmoniums, xylophones and zithers.
I can barely see my feet most of the time, but I'm not with child, and if Brit has a protruding belly, she's not alone among the millions of women who don't have stomachs like xylophones.
John Reynolds, 41, of Holborne Close, Ryton, Gateshead, was told by magistrates at Alnwick the colourful toy xylophones, he supplied to a store in the town presented "a huge risk of physical harm to children".
Ratts of the Capital mercifully sounds nothing like the 1980s heavy metal muthas Ratt and more like a twisted and paranoid version of the theme from Trumpton with plinky plonky xylophones and guitars.
Consisting of gongs, xylophones and drums accented by flute and plucked strings, a gamelan ensemble can feature anywhere from two to 35 musicians.
His set was highlighted by the diverse use of instrumentation on show: cello, mandolin, piano, and xylophones all adding delightful sonic colour to his pure and sometimes moody spirit.
Maple wood also is used for casks, drum sticks, sounding boards, xylophones, and many other products.
The dancers catapulted off the underground I-beams as scraggly skateboarders, punks and squatters played xylophones and paraded boom boxes blasting composer Rinde Eckert's avant-garde melodies.