xylophone

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xy·lo·phone

 (zī′lə-fōn′)
n.
A percussion instrument consisting of a mounted row of wooden bars that are graduated in length to sound a chromatic scale, played with two small mallets.

xy′lo·phon′ist n.
Word History: Alphabet books for children frequently feature the word xylophone because it is one of the few words beginning with x that a child (or most adults, for that matter) would know. The majority of English words beginning with x, including many obscure scientific terms, go back to one of five Greek words: xanthos, "yellow," xenos, "stranger," xēros, "dry," xiphos, "sword," or xulon, "wood." The initial x, representing the Greek letter xi, is now pronounced (z) in English even though it was pronounced (ks) by the Greeks. (It seems that at first, the initial x in English words of Greek origin was pronounced as (gz), like the x in exist, and at some point, (gz) was simplified to the (z) heard today.) In the case of xylophone, xylo- is derived from Greek xulon and -phone represents Greek phōnē, "voice, sound," the same element found in words such as telephone, microphone, and megaphone. Different forms of the xylophone have long been important instruments in many musical traditions, such as those of Africa and Southeast Asia, but in Europe, xylophones remained a minor instrument used mostly in the folk music of Eastern Europe. In the Renaissance depictions of the Dance of Death, however, skeletons are often shown merrily playing on xylophonelike instruments. These instruments were called by various names in Europe over the centuries, but the English term xylophone (along with its relatives in other European languages like French xylophone and German Xylophon) appears to be a creation of the 1800s. In the 1830s, the Russian Jewish xylophone virtuoso Michal Josef Gusikov (1806-1837) toured Europe and created a sensation in Paris and Vienna by playing on something that was introduced to the audience as a wood-and-straw instrument. Thereafter, xylophonelike instruments steadily gained in popularity in Western Europe. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first known attestation of our modern name for the instrument is found in the following description from the April 7, 1866, edition of Athenaeum, a British literary magazine: "A prodigy ... who does wonderful things with little drumsticks on a machine of wooden keys, called the 'xylophone.'" Soon after, in 1874, the French composer Camille Saint-Saëns famously included a part for the xylophone in his Danse Macabre, a musical depiction of the Dance of Death.

xylophone

(ˈzaɪləˌfəʊn)
n
(Instruments) music a percussion instrument consisting of a set of wooden bars of graduated length. It is played with hard-headed hammers
[C19: from xylo- + -phone]
xylophonic adj
xylophonist n

xy•lo•phone

art at xylophagous
(ˈzaɪ ləˌfoʊn)

n.
a musical instrument consisting of a graduated series of wooden bars, usu. sounded by striking with small wooden hammers.
[1865–70]
xy′lo•phon`ist, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.xylophone - a percussion instrument with wooden bars tuned to produce a chromatic scale and with resonatorsxylophone - a percussion instrument with wooden bars tuned to produce a chromatic scale and with resonators; played with small mallets
percussion instrument, percussive instrument - a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by one object striking another
Translations
زايلفونزيلوفون: آلة موسيقيَّهسَيْليفُون
xylofon
xylofon
ksylofoni
ksilofon
xilofon
tréspil, sílófónn
シロホン木琴
실로폰
xylophonium
ksilofonas
ksilofons
xylofón
ksilofon
xylofon
ระนาดฝรั่ง
ksilafonksilofonvurmalı çalgı
mộc cầm

xylophone

[ˈzaɪləfəʊn] Nxilófono m

xylophone

[ˈzaɪləfəʊn] nxylophone m
to play the xylophone → jouer du xylophone

xylophone

nXylofon nt

xylophone

(ˈzailəfəun) noun
a musical instrument consisting of wooden or metal slats of various lengths, which produce different notes when struck by wooden hammers.

xylophone

سَيْليفُون xylofon xylofon Xylophon ξυλόφωνο xilófono ksylofoni xylophone ksilofon xilofono シロホン 실로폰 xylofoon xylofon ksylofon xilofone ксилофон xylofon ระนาดฝรั่ง ksilofon mộc cầm 木琴
References in periodicals archive ?
And in Roger Mistin, the Coventry Theatre have introduced us to one of the best xylophonists I have heard for a long time.
Ideally, I'd want world-renowned xylophonists fighting each other to play La Cucaracha on his ribcage.
During the course of Saturday's attractively-presented evening there were many notable contributions: forward, positive oboes and confident horns in Milhaud's Suite Francaise; supremely assured trumpets and an invigorating side-drummer in Prokofiev's Peter and the Wolf, Jeffrey Dench the engaging (if occasionally over-balanced) narrator and a pair of amazing xylophonists in movements from Shostakovich's Jazz Suite no2.