yakimono


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yakimono

(ˌjækɪˈmɒnəʊ)
n
1. (Cookery) (in Japan) grilled, fried, or broiled food, esp meat
2. (Ceramics) (in Japan) pottery
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Hot specials comprise of Lobster Wasabi Pepper - Maine lobster, sauteed mixed vegetables, and fresh ground black pepper; Squid Pasta - seared squid, sauteed mixed vegetables, Japanese 7 spice, and light garlic sauce; Chawanmushi - savory dashi egg custard; Beef Tenderloin Tobanyaki - grilled beef, caramelized onions, asparagus, shiitake, and butter yuzu sauce; Mushroom Kamameshi - Japanese kettle rice, mixed seasonal mushrooms, edamame, and shiitake broth; and Wagyu Beef Yakimono - grilled wagyu beef, miso mushrooms, aged balsamic reduction, and crispy garlic.
For our yakimono (grilled) course, a skin-on back fillet was roasted and served with a generous topping of unusually warm Tartaryaki sauce.
1938) created a work in the city of Tenjiku that consisted of "firing" the ground with a blowtorch, a gesture that can be said to constitute the zero degree of pottery: while in English the word pottery denotes the vessel-like form of the object, in Japanese yakimono (fired thing) stresses the passage of the object through fire.
Whence the creation of the term obuje-yaki, fired object, in distinction to the traditional word yakimono.
En 1592 emprendio una guerra contra el reino de Choson, conocida en Japon como yakimono senso, "guerra de la ceramica", y en los anales de la historia coreana como imdyin weran, "la guerra del ano del dragon de agua" (N.
Sauces used with shrimp include creamy garlic, butter garlic, yogurt garlic, creamy curry, Thai curry, sweet & sour, hot & spicy, natural saffron, tomato basil, smokey barbecue, honey mustard and yakimono.
Choose foods described as yakimono, which means grilled," advised the monthly "to do list" in the April Men's Health.
Single and group orders of premium sushi, sashimi, tempura, yakimono, teppan and other mouth-watering Japanese goodies are in Saisaki's G2Go menu.
Although the whole production is at the discretion of the artist (read: the chef), a kaiseki is served in a traditional order: sakizuke, an amuse-bouche; hassun, which sets the season's theme and usually includes sushi and several small side dishes; mukozuke, the sashimi; takiawase, vegetables served with meat, fish or tofu; futamono, typically a soup served with a lid; yakimono, a grilled dish; suzakana, a small dish used to refresh the palate; hiyashi-bachi for summer meals, usually lightly cooked vegetables; naka-choko, another palate-cleansing soup; shiizakana, a main dish; gohan, a rice dish; ko-no mono, pickled vegetables; tome-wan, a vegetable soup served with the rice; and mizumono, a dessert.
Before the yakimono or grilled course, a young chef came in with a basket of jumping sweetfish or ayu, as if to show us how fresh the next dish was going to be.