yashmak

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yash·mak

also yash·mac  (yäsh-mäk′, yăsh′măk)
n.
A veil worn by Muslim women to cover the face in public.

[Turkish yaşmak.]

yashmak

(ˈjæʃmæk) or

yashmac

n
(Islam) the face veil worn by Muslim women when in public
[C19: from Arabic]

yash•mak

or yash•mac or yas•mak

(yɑʃˈmɑk, ˈyæʃ mæk)

n.
the veil worn by Muslim women.
[1835–45; < Turkish yaşmak]

yashmak

A veil worn by Muslim women to cover the face when in public.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yashmak - the face veil worn by Muslim womenyashmak - the face veil worn by Muslim women  
head covering, veil - a garment that covers the head and face
Translations
يَشْمَق: حِجاب المَرأه
jašmak
yashmak
arcfátyol
blæja
čadra
jašmaksparandža
maramaveozarвеозар

yashmak

[ˈjæʃmæk] Nvelo m (de musulmana)

yashmak

nSchleier m (von Moslemfrauen)

yashmak

[ˈjæʃmæk] nvelo (indossato dalle donne musulmane)

yashmak

(ˈjӕʃmӕk) noun
a veil worn by Moslem women, covering the face below the eyes.
References in periodicals archive ?
n]ow in the purlieus of Constantinople a great deal of the Gorgeous East still runs warm; a vine was laced across the road, a various torrent of red fezes, turbans, yashmaks, European respectability came pouring down it, like a turbulent Highland water.
The young harem musician performs for what also seem to be recently arrived guests, as these women wear yashmaks, and at least one wears a feredge.
The place names brought vivid images of hot colours and hot sunshine, the smell of spices and sandalwood on the breeze; women in yashmaks or saris wearing jewelled slippers - in my imagination I visited them all.
Give him a fortune to spend and ensure all women at the club wear yashmaks for their own safety.
No one expects pregnant women to wear yashmaks, but there are limits to the 'if you've got it, flaunt it' attitude.
Some might place caps on the heads of their dummies or even dress them in yashmaks and veils.
From the very beginning her "Studies in Pen and Ink" offer vivid imagery, a wide and quirky range of reference (Krishna, Croatia, crumpled paper and bed sheets, corn snakes, and yashmaks [veils used by Muslim women to cover the face]), and an interesting tension between disciplined description and disturbing imagery.