ycleped

clepe

 (klēp)
tr.v. cleped (klēpt, klĕpt), cleped or clept (klĕpt) or y·clept (ĭ-klĕpt′) or y·cleped (ĭ-klēpt′, ĭ-klĕpt′), clep·ing, clepes Archaic
To call; name.

[Middle English clepen, from Old English cleopian, to cry out.]

y·clept

 (ĭ-klĕpt′) or y·cleped (ĭ-klēpt′, ĭ-klĕpt′)
v. Archaic
A past participle of clepe.

[Middle English icleped, from Old English geclepod, past participle of gecleopian, to call : ge-, verb pref.; see kom in Indo-European roots + cleopian, to call.]
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References in classic literature ?
to those sounds which, in the pleasant mansions of that gate which seems to derive its name from a duplicity of tongues, issue from the mouths, and sometimes from the nostrils, of those fair river nymphs, ycleped of old the Naiades; in the vulgar tongue translated oyster-wenches; for when, instead of the antient libations of milk and honey and oil, the rich distillation from the juniper-berry, or, perhaps, from malt, hath, by the early devotion of their votaries, been poured forth in great abundance, should any daring tongue with unhallowed license prophane,
It is ful fair to been ycleped `madame', And goon to vigilies al bifore And have a mantel roialliche ybore.