yeoman

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Related to Yeomen: yeomen of the guard

yeo·man

 (yō′mən)
n.
1.
a. An attendant, servant, or lesser official in a royal or noble household.
b. A yeoman of the guard.
2. A petty officer performing chiefly clerical duties in the US Navy.
3. An assistant or other subordinate, as of a sheriff.
4. A diligent, dependable worker.
5. A farmer who cultivates his own land, especially a member of a former class of small freeholders in England.

[Middle English yeman, yoman, perhaps contraction of yong man, young man (yong, young; see young + man, man; see man), or from Old English *gēaman (from or akin to Old Frisian gāman, villager : , region, district + man, man; see man- in Indo-European roots).]

yeoman

(ˈjəʊmən)
n, pl -men
1. (Historical Terms) history
a. a member of a class of small freeholders of common birth who cultivated their own land
b. an assistant or other subordinate to an official, such as a sheriff, or to a craftsman or trader
c. an attendant or lesser official in a royal or noble household
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Britain) another name for yeoman of the guard
3. (Historical Terms) (modifier) characteristic of or relating to a yeoman
4. (Military) a petty officer or noncommissioned officer in the Royal Navy or Marines in charge of signals
[C15: perhaps from yongman young man]

yeo•man

(ˈyoʊ mən)

n., pl. -men,
adj. n.
1. an enlisted person in the U.S. Navy whose duties are chiefly clerical.
2. Brit. a farmer who cultivates his own land.
3. (formerly, in England)
a. one of a class of lesser freeholders, below the gentry, who cultivated their own land.
b. an attendant in a royal or other great household.
c. an assistant, as of a sheriff or other official.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to yeomen.
5. (esp. of an arduous task) performed in a loyal, valiant, or workmanlike manner.
[1300–50; Middle English yeman, yoman, probably reduced forms of yengman, yongman, yungman, with similar sense; see young, man]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yeoman - officer in the (ceremonial) bodyguard of the British monarchyeoman - officer in the (ceremonial) bodyguard of the British monarch
bodyguard, escort - someone who escorts and protects a prominent person
2.yeoman - in former times was free and cultivated his own land
freeholder - the owner of a freehold
Translations

yeoman

[ˈjəʊmən] N (yeomen (pl)) (Brit) (Hist)
1. (also yeoman farmer) → pequeño propietario m, terrateniente m rural
2. (Mil) → soldado m (voluntario) de caballería
yeoman of the guardalabardero m de la Casa Real
to give yeoman serviceprestar grandes servicios

yeoman

[ˈjəʊmən] n
Yeoman of the Guard → hallebardier m de la garde royale

yeoman

n pl <-men>
(Hist: = small landowner) → Freibauer m; yeoman farmer (Hist) → Freibauer m
Yeoman of the Guardköniglicher Leibgardist; to do yeoman servicetreue Dienste leisten (for sb jdm)

yeoman

[ˈjəʊmən] n (-men (pl)) (Brit) (old) → piccolo proprietario terriero
References in classic literature ?
It was at this identical spot that the unfortunate Andre was captured, and under the covert of those chestnuts and vines were the sturdy yeomen concealed who surprised him.
Everybody was frantic over this loss, and two brave yeomen sacrificed their lives in ransacking the burning house seeking that valuable personage.
Eighteen persons hanged or butch- ered, and two yeomen and thirteen prisoners lost in the fire.
It was still that glorious war-time which was felt to be a peculiar favour of Providence towards the landed interest, and the fall of prices had not yet come to carry the race of small squires and yeomen down that road to ruin for which extravagant habits and bad husbandry were plentifully anointing their wheels.
However far he may venture in a more full detail of passions and feelings, than is to be found in the ancient compositions which he imitates, he must introduce nothing inconsistent with the manners of the age; his knights, squires, grooms, and yeomen, may be more fully drawn than in the hard, dry delineations of an ancient illuminated manuscript, but the character and costume of the age must remain inviolate; they must be the same figures, drawn by a better pencil, or, to speak more modestly, executed in an age when the principles of art were better understood.
I likewise delivered up my watch, which the emperor was very curious to see, and commanded two of his tallest yeomen of the guards to bear it on a pole upon their shoulders, as draymen in England do a barrel of ale.
A moment of silence ensued, and then was heard the rustling of leaves and crackling of twigs like the coming of many men; and forth from the glade burst a score or two of stalwart yeomen, all clad in Lincoln green, like Robin, with good Will Stutely and the widow's three sons at their head.
I once had it in contemplation to spend a month hereabouts, in sleighing time, for the sake of studying the yeomen of New England, who then elbow each other through the Notch by hundreds, on their way to Portland.
A party of constables with their staves followed the sheriff, preceding Marmaduke and four plain, grave-looking yeomen, who were his associates on the bench.
No archer ever lived that could speed a gray goose shaft with such skill and cunning as his, nor were there ever such yeomen as the sevenscore merry men that roamed with him through the greenwood shades.
Yeomen prickers they are, who tend to the King's hunt.
Half clodhopper, half board-school prig, they can still throw back to a nobler stock, and breed yeomen.