yerd

yerd

(jɜːd)
vb (tr)
to beat (someone or something) using a rod or stick
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Tenders are invited for Provn of certain lbw, pertain temporary store yerd , veh washing platform with ramp and rev works under age b/r-ii area at ge gwalior
I wonder if you''ve yerd abaat A taan called 'Utthersfi''ld; It''s nooan a showpiece soort o'' spot Wi'' ancient ruins filled.
To the right of the mace are a set of pen trials, beneath which is a brief memorandum of expenses for Bruges satin in an early sixteenth-century hand: Item for a yerd and a quarter of saten ebregys [ij.
Marwick (1929) lists yeird, meaning 'earth'and gives the Scots form as yerd.
The bittre frostes, with the sleet and reyn, The bitter frosts, with the sleet and rain, Destroyed hath the grene in every yerd.
In 1606, the churchwardens discovered 'that in the week after whitsunday by reason of a cobbe aell then held in the Church yerd was throwing with a bowll to a par of keells for a spone'.
Aye, Ah've yerd 'at Fred reckons 'e could rahde tread off tyres", Ah replahd.
I celebrate Memorial Day by putting a flag up in the front yerd.
2A/2B, (c) Feeding the crushed coal from crushed coal yerd to the reclaim hopper no.
Ah've even yerd abaat an insurance fella followin' an ambulance ter an accident ter see if 'e could drum up a bit o' business.
Nay, Ah've nivver yerd owt ser daft in awl mi lahfe", Ethel spluttered.
Jack sed 'e'd yerd ooanly t' day afooar 'at Jooa wer laid up i' bed.