yersiniosis


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Related to yersiniosis: Yersinia pestis, yersinia

yer·sin·i·o·sis

 (yər-sĭn′ē-ō′sĭs)
n.
An intestinal disease with symptoms resembling those of appendicitis, occurring chiefly in children and young adults and caused by a species of yersinia (Yersinia enterocolitica) that infects humans and animals.

yersiniosis

(ˌjɜːsɪnɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
(Medicine) an infectious disease marked by abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and fever
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References in periodicals archive ?
pseudotuberculosis, are the most common causative agents of Yersiniosis, a self-limiting gastrointestinal disease which is transmitted via the faecal oral-route (1-3).
infection, 3 noncholera (including parahaemolyticus and vulnificus) West Nile disease 3 Yersiniosis 3 * [HLM.
Additional clinical information can further favor the diagnoses of tularemia (for instance, history of tick bite) and yersiniosis (such as history of consumption of undercooked meat).
coli, (7) listeria, (8) rabies, (9) salmonella, (10) staphylococcus, tuberculosis, typhoid fever, and yersiniosis.
Colibacillosis has been known to kill green finches, siskins, chaffinches and blue tits, while a wide range of birds are susceptible to pasteurellosis and yersiniosis.
Although yersiniosis is primarily considered a foodborne disease associated with the consumption of pork products (108-110,113-115), it has also been recovered from the floors and viscera tables in slaughterhouses and is considered by some researchers to be an occupationally acquired disease (111,112).
Overall rates were similar to those reported for vibriosis and yersiniosis (12).
Notifiable enteric infections included salmonellosis, shigellosis, giardiasis, yersiniosis, cryptosporidiosis, cyclosporosis, campylobacteriosis, amebiasis and Escherichia coli infections.
In surgical specimens, caseous necrosis and necrotizing lymph adenitis characteristic of tuberculosis and yersiniosis were absent.
Yersiniosis, a notifiable disease in Norway, is the fourth most common cause of acute bacterial enteritis registered by the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases.
double dagger]) The study was limited to campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, listeriosis, infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, yersiniosis, and infection with norovirus.
To examine the stability of the notification system for enteric diseases during the period of interest, we compared rates for campylobacteriosis notification and hospitalization with rates for 3 other notifiable enteric diseases (salmonellosis, yersiniosis, and cryptosporidiosis).