yew


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yew
English yew
Taxus baccata

yew

 (yo͞o)
n.
1. Any of several poisonous evergreen coniferous trees or shrubs of the genus Taxus, having scarlet cup-shaped arils and flat needles that are dark green above and yellowish below. Yews contain compounds used in medicine and are often grown as ornamentals.
2. The wood of any of these trees, especially the durable, fine-grained wood of the Eurasian and North African species Taxus baccata, used in cabinetmaking and for archery bows.

[Middle English, from Old English īw.]

yew

(juː)
n
1. (Plants) any coniferous tree of the genus Taxus, of the Old World and North America, esp T. baccata, having flattened needle-like leaves, fine-grained elastic wood, and solitary seeds with a red waxy aril resembling berries: family Taxaceae
2. (Forestry) the wood of any of these trees, used to make bows for archery
3. (Archery) archery a bow made of yew
[Old English īw; related to Old High German īwa, Old Norse ӯr yew, Latin ūva grape, Russian iva willow]

yew1

(yu)

n.
1. any of several evergreen trees or shrubs of the genus Taxus, of the family Taxaceae, having needlelike foliage and seeds enclosed in a fleshy aril.
2. the fine-grained, elastic wood of any of these trees.
3. an archer's bow made of this wood.
[before 900; Middle English ew(e), Old English ēow, ī(o)w, c. Old Saxon īh, Old High German īga, īwa, Old Norse ýr, Middle Irish yew (Old Irish: stem, shaft), Welsh ywen yew tree, Russian íva willow]

yew2

(yu; unstressed yʊ)

pron.
Eye Dial. you.

yew

(yo͞o)
Any of various evergreen trees or shrubs that have short, flat needles and solitary seeds contained in a red, berry-like covering instead of a cone. Yews are found chiefly in cooler temperate regions in the Northern Hemisphere.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yew - wood of a yewyew - wood of a yew; especially the durable fine-grained light brown or red wood of the English yew valued for cabinetwork and archery bows
yew - any of numerous evergreen trees or shrubs having red cup-shaped berries and flattened needlelike leaves
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
2.yew - any of numerous evergreen trees or shrubs having red cup-shaped berries and flattened needlelike leavesyew - any of numerous evergreen trees or shrubs having red cup-shaped berries and flattened needlelike leaves
California nutmeg, nutmeg-yew, Torreya californica - California evergreen having a fruit resembling a nutmeg but with a strong turpentine flavor
stinking cedar, stinking yew, Torrey tree, Torreya taxifolia - rare small evergreen of northern Florida; its glossy green leaves have an unpleasant fetid smell when crushed
family Taxaceae, Taxaceae, yew family - sometimes classified as member of order Taxales
yew - wood of a yew; especially the durable fine-grained light brown or red wood of the English yew valued for cabinetwork and archery bows
English yew, Old World yew, Taxus baccata - predominant yew in Europe; extraordinarily long-lived and slow growing; one of the oldest species in the world
California yew, Pacific yew, Taxus brevifolia, western yew - small or medium irregularly branched tree of the Pacific coast of North America; yields fine hard close-grained wood
Japanese yew, Taxus cuspidata - shrubby hardy evergreen of China and Japan having lustrous dark green foliage; cultivated in the eastern United States
Florida yew, Taxus floridana - small bushy yew of northern Florida having spreading branches and very narrow leaves
Austrotaxus spicata, New Caledonian yew - large yew native to New Caledonia; cultivated in eastern Australia and New Zealand and Hawaii
Pseudotaxus chienii, white-berry yew - yew of southeastern China, differing from the Old World yew in having white berries
conifer, coniferous tree - any gymnospermous tree or shrub bearing cones
Translations
شَجَر الطَّقْسوسطَقْسُوس
tis
takstakstræ
EibeEibenholz
jugapuu
marjakuusi
tisa
tiszafa
ÿviîur, ÿr
イチイ
주목
kukmedis
īve
tis
idegran
ต้นไม้ที่เขียวตลอดปี
cây thủy tùng

yew

[juː] N (also yew tree) → tejo m

yew

[ˈjuː] nif mY-fronts® [ˈwaɪfrʌnts] npl (British)slip m kangourou

yew

n (also yew tree)Eibe f; (= wood)Eibe (→ nholz nt) f

yew

[juː] n (also yew tree) → tasso

yew

(juː) noun
a type of evergreen tree with dark leaves and red berries.

yew

طَقْسُوس tis taks Eibe ήμερο έλατο tejo marjakuusi if tisa tasso イチイ 주목 taxusboom barlind cis teixo тис idegran ต้นไม้ที่เขียวตลอดปี porsuk ağacı cây thủy tùng 紫杉
References in classic literature ?
He could lick any man in England, with one hand tied behind him; and he could take his yew bow and plug a ten-cent piece every time, a mile and a half.
Then, there is a dove-cote, some delightful stew-ponds, and a very pretty canal; and every thing, in short, that one could wish for; and, moreover, it is close to the church, and only a quarter of a mile from the turnpike-road, so 'tis never dull, for if you only go and sit up in an old yew arbour behind the house, you may see all the carriages that pass along.
But now, upo' Christmas-day, this blessed Christmas as is ever coming, if you was to take your dinner to the bakehus, and go to church, and see the holly and the yew, and hear the anthim, and then take the sacramen', you'd be a deal the better, and you'd know which end you stood on, and you could put your trust i' Them as knows better nor we do, seein' you'd ha' done what it lies on us all to do.
A well-kept lawn, with six-hundred-years-old cedars and a twenty-feet yew hedge, will add distinction to the meal.
So help me Heaven, as there is nought in it but some merchandises which I will gladly part with to you one hundred yards of Lincoln green to make doublets to thy men, and a hundred staves of Spanish yew to make bows, and a hundred silken bowstrings, tough, round, and sound these will I send thee for thy good-will, honest Diccon, an thou wilt keep silence about the vault, my good Diccon.
They were going along conversing in this way, when they saw descending a gap between two high mountains some twenty shepherds, all clad in sheepskins of black wool, and crowned with garlands which, as afterwards appeared, were, some of them of yew, some of cypress.
He traveled lightly; but his yew bow must needs have a new string, and his cloth-yard arrows must be of the straightest and soundest.
I took up my place behind a yew tree, and I saw his dark figure move until the intervening headstones and trees hid it from my sight.
SIR JOHN and LADY CAROLINE PONTEFRACT, MISS WORSLEY, on chairs under large yew tree.
Accordingly I turned up a by-path to the right; I had not followed it far ere it brought me, as I expected, into the fields, amidst which, just before me, stretched a long and lofty white wall enclosing, as it seemed from the foliage showing above, some thickly planted nursery of yew and cypress, for of that species were the branches resting on the pale parapets, and crowding gloomily about a massive cross, planted doubtless on a central eminence and extending its arms, which seemed of black marble, over the summits of those sinister trees.
I followed the footsteps down the yew alley, I saw the spot at the moor-gate where he seemed to have waited, I remarked the change in the shape of the prints after that point, I noted that there were no other footsteps save those of Barrymore on the soft gravel, and finally I carefully examined the body, which had not been touched until my arrival.
So up he got and took his good stout yew bow and a score or more of broad clothyard arrows, and started off from Locksley Town through Sherwood Forest to Nottingham.