yield point


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Related to yield point: plastic viscosity

yield point

n
(General Physics) the stress at which an elastic material under increasing stress ceases to behave elastically; under conditions of tensile strength the elongation is no longer proportional to the increase in stress. Also called: yield stress or yield strength
References in periodicals archive ?
Another series of experiments was carried out at 413 K (140[degrees]C) to examine the evolution of the first knee-like yield point into the upper yield point.
Here, no knee point was indicated and the load increased more or less steadily until 2-3 mm, and then a big load decline indicates the yield point.
As reported by Schrauwen and his coworkers [14], for high-density polyethylene, the deformation mechanism of both yield points are generally associated to fine chain slip, combined with a martensitic transformation within the lamellae at the first yield point and a coarse chain slip resulting in lamellar fragmentation at the second yield point.
The obtained main static mechanical properties in within the group are very similar: steel's CS500 yield point [R.
A marked decay in the apparent modulus will be observed for plastics that are under continuous stress at levels below the yield point of the material for an extended period of time.
The range of shear rates tested per ASTM standards is limited, such that the measurements do not necessarily identify the yield point.
Yield or Berry Size," in which the real action in loss of quality occurs above some specific relatively high yield point.
The currently popular practice of assuming the plasticity to set in only at the Yield point provides computational advantage by separating the complete nonlinear curve, obtained from RO method, into elastic and plastic regions.
Qingdao, China), including Apparent viscosity (AV), Plastic viscosity (PV), Yield point (YP), Dynamic plastic ratio (YP/PV), API Filtration (FL) and Friction coefficient ().
The yield point is not enough to tell you how the material reacts to stress.
Many technical problems need to be solved in order to fully understand the rock failure process (Sun and Zhu, 2014), such as accurately determining the Poisson's ratio and identifying rock yield point.
Each stress-strain curve has a diffuse upper yield strength, followed by a long region of yield point elongation, also called a Luders strain.