yielding


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Related to yielding: unsystematic, flatterable

yield·ing

 (yēl′dĭng)
adj.
Inclined to give way to pressure, argument, or influence; docile.

yield′ing·ly adv.
yield′ing·ness n.

yielding

(ˈjiːldɪŋ)
adj
1. compliant, submissive, or flexible
2. pliable or soft: a yielding material.
ˈyieldingly adv
ˈyieldingness n

yield•ing

(ˈyil dɪŋ)

adj.
1. submissive; compliant.
2. tending to give way, esp. under pressure; flexible.
3. (of a crop, soil, etc.) producing a yield; productive.
[1300–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yielding - a verbal act of admitting defeatyielding - a verbal act of admitting defeat  
relinquishing, relinquishment - a verbal act of renouncing a claim or right or position etc.
2.yielding - the act of conceding or yielding
assent, acquiescence - agreement with a statement or proposal to do something; "he gave his assent eagerly"; "a murmur of acquiescence from the assembly"
bye, pass - you advance to the next round in a tournament without playing an opponent; "he had a bye in the first round"
Adj.1.yielding - inclined to yield to argument or influence or control; "a timid yielding person"
docile - willing to be taught or led or supervised or directed; "the docile masses of an enslaved nation"
2.yielding - lacking stiffness and giving way to pressure; "a deep yielding layer of foam rubber"
soft - yielding readily to pressure or weight
3.yielding - tending to give in or surrender or agree; "too yielding to make a stand against any encroachments"- V.I.Parrington
compromising, conciliatory, flexible - making or willing to make concessions; "loneliness tore through him...whenever he thought of...even the compromising Louis du Tillet"

yielding

yielding

adjective
Yielding easily to pressure or weight; not firm:
Translations

yielding

[ˈjiːldɪŋ] ADJ
1. (= soft) [ground, surface, substance] → flexible, blando
2. (= compliant, submissive) [person] (in temperament) → complaciente; (physically) → tierno

yielding

adj personnachgiebig; surface, materialnachgebend; the ground is yieldingder Boden gibt nach

yielding

[ˈjiːldɪŋ] adj (person) → arrendevole; (ground, surface) → cedevole
References in classic literature ?
I had never seen her so energetic; she was panting with zeal, and the perspiration stood in drops on her short, yielding upper lip.
The physical need for sleep began to overtake her; the exuberance which had sustained and exalted her spirit left her helpless and yielding to the conditions which crowded her in.
She pointed persuasively along the path with her riding whip, while their eyes met in a look which the young man lingered a moment to prolong; then, yielding to her gentle influence, he clapped his spurs into his charger, and in a few bounds was again at the side of Cora.
We come to it freshly, in the dewy youth of the day, and when our spiritual and sensual elements are in better accord than at a later period; so that the material delights of the morning meal are capable of being fully enjoyed, without any very grievous reproaches, whether gastric or conscientious, for yielding even a trifle overmuch to the animal department of our nature.
Whenever Pearl saw anything to excite her ever active and wandering curiosity, she flew thitherward, and, as we might say, seized upon that man or thing as her own property, so far as she desired it, but without yielding the minutest degree of control over her motions in requital.
My candle, under a bold flourish, went out, and I perceived, by the uncovered window, that the yielding dusk of earliest morning rendered it unnecessary.
But as the mind does not exist unless leagued with the soul, therefore it must have been that, in Ahab's case, yielding up all his thoughts and fancies to his one supreme purpose; that purpose, by its own sheer inveteracy of will, forced itself against gods and devils into a kind of self-assumed, independent being of its own.