yogh


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yogh

 (yōk, yōg, yōKH)
n.
The Middle English letter ʓ, used to represent the sound (y) and some velar consonants similar to the ch in German Bach and the r in French France.

[Middle English, possibly from Old English īw, ēoh, yew.]

yogh

(jɒɡ)
n
1. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) a character (ȝ) used in Old and Middle English to represent a palatal fricative very close to the semivowel sound of Modern English y, as in Old English ȝeong (young)
2. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) this same character as used in Middle English for both the voiced and voiceless palatal fricatives; when final or in a closed syllable in medial position the sound approached that of German ch in ich, as in knyȝt (knight). After the 14th century this symbol became the modern consonantal (semivocalic) y when initial or commencing a syllable, and though no longer pronounced in medial position it is preserved in many words by a modern gh, as in thought
[C14: perhaps from yok yoke, referring to the letter's shape]

yogh

(yoʊx)

n.
the letter ȝ used in the writing of Middle English to represent a palatal fricative, as in ȝong (Modern English young), or a velar fricative, as in liȝtliche (Modern English lightly).
[1250–1300; Middle English yogh]
References in periodicals archive ?
The reproduction of the Anglo-Saxon alphabet for AElfric's text, including not only the runic characters thorn and wen, but also letters eth, ash, yogh, tau, long <s> and <r>, does not seem to be a casual decision but a rather meditated one by Parker.
5lb Weight now: 9st 7lb Top size: 16 Size now: 10 Menu before: Breakfast: Porridge Snack: Sausage roll or bacon sandwich Lunch: Ham and cheese panini, fried onions, crisps Snack: Chocolate Fat file: Weight now Menu be Sausage roll cheese paninbar Dinner: FMenu aft fat-free yogh Dinner: Hom Jaffa Cake (as bar Dinner: Fish and chips Snack: Wine and chocolate Menu after: Breakfast: All-Bran with fruit and fat-free yoghurt Lunch: Home-made vegetable soup Dinner: Home-made curry with rice Snack: Fruit or a Jaffa Cake (as a treat) with a cup of tea Trips abroad became a no-no for us Michelle Lyon, 41, a finance worker is married Rodger, 36.
But most special of all were the two in the southwest comer of the building, used exclusively for those setting manuscripts in Middle English, who had frequent need for various obsolete characters such as thorn, eth, yogh, or wyn (see picture at right).
While much of the textual apparatus is thus well done, the nature of the Middle English Texts Series as a series of teaching editions creates a potential problem: Sponsler clearly explains up front that series conventions require modernization of thorn and yogh, and regularization of u/v/w and i/j, along with silent expansion of abbreviations and other relatively straightforward orthographical changes (10).
At an interim stage of the development this became the letter yogh (pronounced as y) which looked a cross between a y and a z (see the mediaeval poem Sir Gawaine and the Green Knight for exemplification).
The other was yogh (below right), which looked like a lowercase z, but curving below the line.
The z represents the old yogh and the pronunciation, regardless of spelling, was normally Dee-ell.
The scribe wrote the letter thorn in the form y, and yogh is used to represent final z, as well as having its normal function initially.
In fact, when viewed years hence, the struggle to define the legacies of Princess Diana and Mother Teresa will have reached a "canonical" form, and this essay's efforts to pin down the sprawling expanse of the digital reactions to their lives and deaths will appear as quaint and foreign as medieval manuscripts featuring the thorn (p) and yogh (3).
14 I quote from Gordon's edition, but I transliterate the manuscript's less familiar yogh and thorn symbols, as well as the consonantal us, into their equivalents in modern orthography.
A principle adopted here from unspecified Canterbury Tales Project transcription guidelines was to reproduce yogh but convert thorn into "th", although both letters characterise the Corpus scribe's spelling practices.
ix, except in the case of [zh], as Jones's symbol for this sound may be confused with the Early English yogh.