yogh

(redirected from yoghs)

yogh

 (yōk, yōg, yōKH)
n.
The Middle English letter ʓ, used to represent the sound (y) and some velar consonants similar to the ch in German Bach and the r in French France.

[Middle English, possibly from Old English īw, ēoh, yew.]

yogh

(jɒɡ)
n
1. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) a character (ȝ) used in Old and Middle English to represent a palatal fricative very close to the semivowel sound of Modern English y, as in Old English ȝeong (young)
2. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) this same character as used in Middle English for both the voiced and voiceless palatal fricatives; when final or in a closed syllable in medial position the sound approached that of German ch in ich, as in knyȝt (knight). After the 14th century this symbol became the modern consonantal (semivocalic) y when initial or commencing a syllable, and though no longer pronounced in medial position it is preserved in many words by a modern gh, as in thought
[C14: perhaps from yok yoke, referring to the letter's shape]

yogh

(yoʊx)

n.
the letter ȝ used in the writing of Middle English to represent a palatal fricative, as in ȝong (Modern English young), or a velar fricative, as in liȝtliche (Modern English lightly).
[1250–1300; Middle English yogh]
References in periodicals archive ?
The characteristically Scots use of yoghs and y-thorns now predominates in places where either of Margaret's siblings, Henry VIII and Mary Tudor (Brandon), would use <y> or <s>, or <th>, respectively (for examples of Henry's spellings in manuscript facsimile see Stemmler 1988; and for Mary, Sadlack's original-spelling transcriptions (2011)).
In terms of graphemes, the latter used yogh for all seven forms of the second person pronoun and the letter to Wolsey uses <y> in all but one of the fourteen instances of 'you'.
Abbreviations are expanded, but winums, thorns, and yoghs are not normalized.
I have replaced all original thorns with th and the yoghs with y, g, or gh (depending on meaning).
22) Middle English characters such as yoghs and thorns have been replaced by their modern equivalents throughout this text.