yoke


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Related to yoke: sarong

yoke

 (yōk)
n.
1.
a. A contoured crossbar having two U-shaped attachments that fit around the necks of a team of oxen or other draft animals, with a central ring for hitching the team to a cart, plow, or other load.
b. pl. yoke or yokes A pair of draft animals, such as oxen, joined by a yoke.
c. A bar used with a double harness to connect the collar of each horse to the pole of a wagon or coach.
2. A frame designed to be carried across a person's shoulders with equal loads suspended from each end.
3. Nautical A crossbar on a ship's rudder to which the steering cables are connected.
4. A clamp or vise that holds a machine part in place or controls its movement or that holds two such parts together.
5. A piece of a garment that is closely fitted, either around the neck and shoulders or at the hips, and from which an unfitted or gathered part of the garment is hung.
6. Something that connects or joins together; a bond or tie.
7. Electronics A series of two or more magnetic recording heads fastened securely together for playing or recording on more than one track simultaneously.
8.
a. Any of various emblems of subjugation, such as a structure made of two upright spears with a third laid across them, under which conquered enemies of ancient Rome were forced to march in subjection.
b. The condition of being subjugated by or as if by a conqueror; subjugation or bondage: 14th-century Russia under the Tatar yoke; the yoke of drug addiction.
v. yoked, yok·ing, yokes
v.tr.
1. To fit or join with a yoke.
2.
a. To harness a draft animal to.
b. To harness (a draft animal) to a vehicle or an implement.
3. To join together; bind: partners who were yoked together for life.
4. To force into heavy labor, bondage, or subjugation.
v.intr.
To become joined.

[Middle English, from Old English geoc; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

yoke

(jəʊk)
n, pl yokes or yoke
1. (Agriculture) a wooden frame, usually consisting of a bar with an oxbow or similar collar-like piece at either end, for attaching to the necks of a pair of draught animals, esp oxen, so that they can be worked as a team
2. (Tools) something resembling a yoke in form or function, such as a frame fitting over a person's shoulders for carrying buckets suspended at either end
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a fitted part of a garment, esp around the neck, shoulders, and chest or around the hips, to which a gathered, pleated, flared, or unfitted part is attached
4. an immense oppressive force or burden: under the yoke of a tyrant.
5. (Agriculture) a pair of oxen or other draught animals joined together by a yoke
6. (Mechanical Engineering) a part, esp one of relatively thick cross section, that secures two or more components so that they move together
7. (Mechanical Engineering) a crosshead that transmits the drive of an opposed piston engine from the upper of a pair of linked pistons to the crankshaft through a connecting rod
8. (Building) a steel framework around the formwork during the casting of concrete
9. (Nautical Terms) nautical a crossbar fixed athwartships to the head of a rudderpost in a small boat, to which are attached ropes or cables for steering
10. (Tools) a Y-shaped cable, rope, or chain, used for holding, towing, etc
11. (Historical Terms) (in the ancient world) a symbolic reconstruction of a yoke, consisting of two upright spears with a third lashed across them, under which conquered enemies were compelled to march, esp in Rome
12. a mark, token, or symbol of slavery, subjection, or suffering
13. rare a link, tie, or bond: the yoke of love.
14. (Agriculture) dialect Brit a period of steady work, esp the time during which a ploughman and his team work at a stretch
15. (Tools) Irish any device, unusual object, or gadget: where's the yoke for opening tins?.
vb
16. (Agriculture) (tr) to secure or harness (a draught animal) to (a plough, vehicle, etc) by means of a yoke
17. to join or be joined by means of a yoke; couple, unite, or link
18. (tr) obsolete to oppress, burden, or enslave
[Old English geoc; related to Old High German ioh, Old Norse ok, Gothic juk, Latin iugum, Sanskrit yugam]
ˈyokeless adj

yoke

(yoʊk)

n., pl. yokes for 1,3-20, yoke for 2; n.
1. a device for joining together a pair of draft animals, esp. oxen, usu. consisting of a crosspiece with two bow-shaped pieces, each enclosing the head of an animal. Compare harness (def. 1).
2. a pair of draft animals fastened together by a yoke.
3. something resembling a yoke in form or use.
4. a frame fitting a person's neck and shoulders, for carrying a pair of buckets or the like.
5. an agency of oppression, servitude, etc.
6. an emblem or symbol of subjection, servitude, etc., as an archway under which prisoners of war were compelled to pass by the ancient Romans and others.
7. something that couples or binds together; bond or tie.
8. a viselike piece gripping two parts firmly together.
9. a fitting for the neck of a draft animal for suspending the tongue of a cart, carriage, etc., from a harness.
10. (in an airplane) a double handle, somewhat like a steering wheel in form, by which the elevators are controlled.
11. a crossbar on the head of a rudder, rigged so that a boat can be steered from forward.
12. a shaped and fitted piece in a garment, as at the shoulders or the hips, from which the rest of the garment hangs.
13. an electromagnetic assembly placed around the neck of a cathode-ray tube to produce and control the scanning motion of electron beams inside the tube.
v.t.
14. to put a yoke on.
15. to attach (a draft animal) to a plow or vehicle.
16. to harness a draft animal to (a plow or vehicle).
17. to join, couple, link, or unite.
18. Obs. to bring into subjection or servitude.
v.i.
19. to be or become joined, linked, or united.
[before 900; Old English geoc, c. Old High German joh, Old Norse ok, Latin jugum, Greek zygón, Skt yugám]

Yoke

 a pair of animals, especially oxen, that are or may be coupled by a yoke, hence, a pair or couple of animals, things, or persons.
Examples: yoke of bulls, 1660; of cattle, 1879; of discarded men, 1598; of oxen, c. 1200.

yoke


Past participle: yoked
Gerund: yoking

Imperative
yoke
yoke
Present
I yoke
you yoke
he/she/it yokes
we yoke
you yoke
they yoke
Preterite
I yoked
you yoked
he/she/it yoked
we yoked
you yoked
they yoked
Present Continuous
I am yoking
you are yoking
he/she/it is yoking
we are yoking
you are yoking
they are yoking
Present Perfect
I have yoked
you have yoked
he/she/it has yoked
we have yoked
you have yoked
they have yoked
Past Continuous
I was yoking
you were yoking
he/she/it was yoking
we were yoking
you were yoking
they were yoking
Past Perfect
I had yoked
you had yoked
he/she/it had yoked
we had yoked
you had yoked
they had yoked
Future
I will yoke
you will yoke
he/she/it will yoke
we will yoke
you will yoke
they will yoke
Future Perfect
I will have yoked
you will have yoked
he/she/it will have yoked
we will have yoked
you will have yoked
they will have yoked
Future Continuous
I will be yoking
you will be yoking
he/she/it will be yoking
we will be yoking
you will be yoking
they will be yoking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been yoking
you have been yoking
he/she/it has been yoking
we have been yoking
you have been yoking
they have been yoking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been yoking
you will have been yoking
he/she/it will have been yoking
we will have been yoking
you will have been yoking
they will have been yoking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been yoking
you had been yoking
he/she/it had been yoking
we had been yoking
you had been yoking
they had been yoking
Conditional
I would yoke
you would yoke
he/she/it would yoke
we would yoke
you would yoke
they would yoke
Past Conditional
I would have yoked
you would have yoked
he/she/it would have yoked
we would have yoked
you would have yoked
they would have yoked

yoke

A part of a garment that is fitted around the neck or shoulders and to which the rest of the garment is attached.

Yoke

A wooden bar attached by wooden bows to the necks of a pair of draft animals such as oxen. The yoke could then be connected to the implement to be pulled. Yokes tended to choke horses and mules so, for them, Collars and Harness were used. Also, see Neck yoke.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yoke - fabric comprising a fitted part at the top of a garment
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
tucker - a detachable yoke of linen or lace worn over the breast of a low-cut dress
2.yoke - an oppressive power; "under the yoke of a tyrant"; "they threw off the yoke of domination"
oppression - the state of being kept down by unjust use of force or authority: "after years of oppression they finally revolted"
3.yoke - two items of the same kindyoke - two items of the same kind    
fellow, mate - one of a pair; "he lost the mate to his shoe"; "one eye was blue but its fellow was brown"
2, II, two, deuce - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number
doubleton - (bridge) a pair of playing cards that are the only cards in their suit in the hand dealt to a player
4.yoke - a pair of draft animals joined by a yoke; "pulled by a yoke of oxen"
pair - two people considered as a unit
5.yoke - support consisting of a wooden frame across the shoulders that enables a person to carry buckets hanging from each end
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
6.yoke - a connection (like a clamp or vise) between two things so they move togetheryoke - a connection (like a clamp or vise) between two things so they move together
connecter, connector, connective, connection, connexion - an instrumentality that connects; "he soldered the connection"; "he didn't have the right connector between the amplifier and the speakers"
7.yoke - stable gear that joins two draft animals at the neck so they can work together as a teamyoke - stable gear that joins two draft animals at the neck so they can work together as a team
saddlery, stable gear, tack - gear for a horse
Verb1.yoke - become joined or linked together
animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
conjoin, join - make contact or come together; "The two roads join here"
2.yoke - link with or as with a yoke; "yoke the oxen together"
animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
attach - cause to be attached
3.yoke - put a yoke on or join with a yoke; "Yoke the draft horses together"
animal husbandry - breeding and caring for farm animals
attach - cause to be attached
inspan - attach a yoke or harness to; "inspan the draft animals"
unyoke - remove the yoke from; "unyoke the cow"

yoke

noun
1. oppression, slavery, bondage, servitude, service, burden, enslavement, serfdom, servility, vassalage, thraldom People are suffering under the yoke of capitalism.
2. harness, coupling, tackle, chain, collar, tack He put a yoke around his body and pulled along the cart.
verb
1. unite, join, link, tie, bond, bind, connect They are yoked by money and votes.
2. harness, join, couple, link, tie, connect, bracket, hitch a plough team of eight oxen yoked in pairs

yoke

noun
1. Two items of the same kind together:
2. That which unites or binds:
3. A state of subjugation to an owner or master:
verb
To bring or come together into a united whole:
Translations
ثَوب فوْق الكَتِفَيْن مُعلَّق بالعُنقنيرنير العُبودِيَّهيَشُد النير الى الثَّورَيْن
иго
jařmosedlovahadlozapřáhnout
ågbindebyrdeskulderstykke
jugo
ike
ies
igojaram
igajáromrabigavállrészigába hajt
beru-/herîastykkiburîartré, vatnsberileggja ok áok, klafiok, klafi, áòján
iugum
jungasnaščiaipakinkytiperpetė
iejūgtjūgskoka iejūgsnēšiplecu daļa
jarmovahadlo
jaremkomat
igoиго
ok
boyunduruğa vurmakboyundurukelbiseye eklenen üst kısımomuz sırığı

yoke

[jəʊk]
A. N (yokes or yoke (pl))
1. [of oxen] → yunta f; (carried on shoulder) → balancín m, percha f (fig) → yugo m
under the yoke of the Nazisbajo el yugo de los nazis
to throw off the yokesacudir el yugo
2. (on dress, blouse) → canesú m
B. VT (also yoke together) [+ oxen] → uncir (fig) → unir

yoke

[ˈjəʊk]
n
(lit) [oxen] → joug m
(fig)joug m
vt (also yoke together) [+ oxen] → accoupler

yoke

n
(for oxen) → Joch nt; (for carrying pails) → (Trag)joch nt, → Schultertrage f
pl <-> (= pair of oxen)Joch nt, → Gespann nt
(fig: = oppression) → Joch nt; to throw off the yokedas Joch abschütteln
(on dress, blouse etc) → Passe f
vt
(also yoke up) oxen(ins Joch) einspannen; to yoke oxen to the ploughOchsen vor den Pflug spannen
pieces of machineryzusammenschließen; to yoke something to somethingetw an etw (acc)anschließen
(fig: = join together) → zusammenschließen, vereinen

yoke

[jəʊk]
1. n
a. (of oxen, also) (fig) → giogo
under the yoke of (fig) → sotto il giogo di
b. (on dress) → sprone m
2. vt (also yoke together) (oxen) → aggiogare

yoke

(jəuk) noun
1. a wooden frame placed over the necks of oxen to hold them together when they are pulling a cart etc.
2. a frame placed across a person's shoulders, for carrying buckets etc.
3. something that weighs people down, or prevents them being free. the yoke of slavery.
4. the part of a garment that fits over the shoulders and round the neck. a black dress with a white yoke.
verb
to join with a yoke. He yoked the oxen to the plough.
References in classic literature ?
It was the whaleman who first broke through the jealous policy of the Spanish crown, touching those colonies; and, if space permitted, it might be distinctly shown how from those whalemen at last eventuated the liberation of Peru, Chili, and Bolivia from the yoke of Old Spain, and the establishment of the eternal democracy in those parts.
Cassy had always kept over Legree the kind of influence that a strong, impassioned woman can ever keep over the most brutal man; but, of late, she had grown more and more irritable and restless, under the hideous yoke of her servitude, and her irritability, at times, broke out into raving insanity; and this liability made her a sort of object of dread to Legree, who had that superstitious horror of insane persons which is common to coarse and uninstructed minds.
That was it, you see--he just done it to get an "effect"; you couldn't 'a' pulled him off of that platform with a yoke of oxen.
Had they been farsighted enough they might have seen, when the stage turned into the side dooryard of the old brick house, a calico yoke rising and falling tempestuously over the beating heart beneath, the red color coming and going in two pale cheeks, and a mist of tears swimming in two brilliant dark eyes.
Be faithful, be vigilant, be untiring in your efforts to break every yoke, and let the oppressed go free.
I rested my temples on the breast of temptation, and put my neck voluntarily under her yoke of flowers.
The yoke a man creates for himself by wrong-doing will breed hate in the kindliest nature; and the good-humoured, affectionate-hearted Godfrey Cass was fast becoming a bitter man, visited by cruel wishes, that seemed to enter, and depart, and enter again, like demons who had found in him a ready-garnished home.
Moreover, the two new kings promised to deal gently with the people, and to lighten the heavy yoke of Chaka, and men in a bad case are always ready to home for a better.
Yes, that's what I mean," said Sylvia; "the people I care about--dear good people--will think no more of me for having a wedding-ring, and no less for my being without; and why should one put a yoke round one's neck when nobody expects it?
Let us not then pursue By force impossible, by leave obtain'd Unacceptable, though in Heav'n, our state Of splendid vassalage, but rather seek Our own good from our selves, and from our own Live to our selves, though in this vast recess, Free, and to none accountable, preferring Hard liberty before the easie yoke Of servile Pomp.
Meanwhile Cedric and Athelstane, the leaders of the troop, conversed together on the state of the land, on the dissensions of the royal family, on the feuds and quarrels among the Norman nobles, and on the chance which there was that the oppressed Saxons might be able to free themselves from the yoke of the Normans, or at least to elevate themselves into national consequence and independence, during the civil convulsions which were likely to ensue.
I heard a chain dragging along the ground, and a yoke of the great sulky white bullocks that drag the heavy siege guns when the elephants won't go any nearer to the firing, came shouldering along together.