yokel


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Related to yokel: local yokel

yo·kel

 (yō′kəl) Informal
n.
A rustic; a bumpkin.

[Perhaps from German dialectal Jokel, Jockel, bumpkin (from diminutive of the name Jakob, German equivalent of English James Jacob) or from English dialectal yuckle, European green woodpecker (Picus viridis), probably a variant of English hickwall (from Middle English hyghwhele, probably from an imitation of its high-pitched call ).]

yokel

(ˈjəʊkəl)
n
(Sociology) derogatory (used chiefly by townspeople) a person who lives in the country, esp one who appears to be simple and old-fashioned
[C19: perhaps from dialect yokel green woodpecker, yellowhammer]
ˈyokelish adj

yo•kel

(ˈyoʊ kəl)

n.
a rustic; country bumpkin.
[1805–15; orig. uncertain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yokel - a person who is not very intelligent or interested in cultureyokel - a person who is not very intelligent or interested in culture
rustic - an unsophisticated country person

yokel

noun peasant, hick (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), rustic, countryman, hillbilly, boor, country cousin, hayseed (U.S. & Canad. informal), bushie or bushy (Austral. & N.Z. informal), clodhopper (informal), (country) bumpkin a local yokel

yokel

noun
A clumsy, unsophisticated person:
Translations
junttimaalaistollo
falusiparaszt
hufter

yokel

[ˈjəʊkəl] Npalurdo/a m/f, pueblerino/a m/f

yokel

[ˈjəʊkəl] n (= bumpkin) → péquenaud(e) m/f

yokel

n (pej)Bauerntölpel m, → Bauerntrampel m

yokel

[ˈjəʊkl] (pej) nzotico/a, villano/a
References in classic literature ?
Seeing that you go from town to town, I ween you can outdo a poor country yokel at tidings.
I would see one of the clumsy bovine-creatures who worked the launch treading heavily through the undergrowth, and find myself asking, trying hard to recall, how he differed from some really human yokel trudging home from his mechanical labours; or I would meet the Fox-bear woman's vulpine, shifty face, strangely human in its speculative cunning, and even imagine I had met it before in some city byway.
I have a notion that I sat there staring and listening like a yokel at a play.
In simple taste and homely inclination this much-travelled map was more simple and homely than the veriest yokel.
And, translating the word yokel for the benefit of the ladies, I apprehend your meaning to be, that this attempt was not made by a countryman?
Well, if a lot of mysterious niggers armed with all kinds of fearful weapons sud- denly took to traveling on the road between Deal and Gravesend, catching the yokels right and left to carry heavy loads for them, I fancy every farm and cottage thereabouts would get empty very soon.
But yet I was a bit sorry for them, because I half believe they slunk into our little empty bar because each of them had a slight deformity; the sort of thing that some yokels laugh at.
bawling in front of their booths, and yokels looking up at the tinselled dancers and poor old rouged tumblers, while the light-fingered folk are operating upon their pockets behind.
AND the BBC piddling away PS12million on a Cornish tourism film (Poldark) with laughable yokel jargon: "Ain't no call to accuse us, Mr Ross.
They were: Bill Abright, Steve Allen, Arthur Gonzalez, Michelle Gregor, Susannah Israel, Margaret Keelan, Marc Lancet, Lisa Reinertson, Richard Shaw, Fred Yokel, and Wanxin Zhang.
As well as directing, Wheatley demonstrated a great skill in quick change and varying persona and accents in the roles of Bartolo and Antonio, the latter as a country yokel, with Martin Quinn also in two roles, a rather viciously camp Basilio and stammering Don Curzio.
Their Heart Of Nowhere is situated somewhere between the Mumfords' gentrified yokel pop and Coldplay's stadium rousers.