yore


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yore

 (yôr)
n.
Time long past: days of yore.

[Middle English, long ago, time long past, from Old English gēara, geāra, long ago, from genitive pl. of gēar, year; see year.]

yore

(jɔː)
n
time long past (now only in the phrase of yore)
adv
obsolete in the past; long ago
[Old English geāra, genitive plural of gēar year; see hour]

yore

(yɔr, yoʊr)

n.
1. Chiefly Literary. time past: knights of yore.
adv.
2. Obs. of old; long ago.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English geāra]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.yore - time long past
past, past times, yesteryear - the time that has elapsed; "forget the past"

yore

noun
A former period of time or of one's life:
Idioms: bygone days, days gone by, the good old days, the old days.
Translations

yore

[jɔːʳ] N (archaic or liter) of yorede antaño, de otro tiempo, de hace siglos
the days of yorelos tiempos de antaño, otros tiempos

yore

n (obs, liter) in days of yorein alten Zeiten; men of yoredie Menschen in alten Zeiten; in the Britain of yoreim Großbritannien längst vergangener Zeiten
References in classic literature ?
The baker's cart, with the harsh music of its bells, had a pleasant effect on Clifford, because, as few things else did, it jingled the very dissonance of yore.
In this enterprise, however, he had more real difficulties than generally fell to the lot of a knight-errant of yore, who seldom had anything but giants, enchanters, fiery dragons, and such like easily conquered adversaries, to contend with and had to make his way merely through gates of iron and brass, and walls of adamant to the castle keep, where the lady of his heart was confined; all which he achieved as easily as a man would carve his way to the centre of a Christmas pie; and then the lady gave him her hand as a matter of course.
Breakfast was not eaten in the kitchen, because it seemed worth while, now that there were three persons, to lay the cloth in the dining- room; it was also a more bountiful meal than of yore, when there was no child to consider.
Omer, shorter-winded than of yore, but not much older-looking, stood before me.
The room was lighted as of yore, and at the sound of our entrance, she stopped and turned.
Here haunted of yore the fabulous Dragon of Wantley; here were fought many of the most desperate battles during the Civil Wars of the Roses; and here also flourished in ancient times those bands of gallant outlaws, whose deeds have been rendered so popular in English song.
Geeka was a perfect little savage; but at heart she was unchanged, being the same omnivorous listener as of yore.
But the Milky Way, it seemed to me, was still the same tattered streamer of star-dust as of yore.
Alone in his usual room, lighted by two candles, the condemned monarch gazed sadly on the luxury of his past greatness, just as at the last hour one sees the images of life more mildly brilliant than of yore.
We cannot estimate the affright which this plague inspired of yore, by contemplating it as the fangless monster of the present day.
Nioche had a new hat and a pair of kid gloves; his clothes, too, seemed to belong to a more recent antiquity than of yore.
Captain Hagberd's movements showed no infirmity: he walked stiffly in his suit of canvas, a quaint and remarkable fig- ure; only his eyes wandered more furtively perhaps than of yore.