you-all

you-all

(yo͞o′ôl′) or y'all (yôl)
pron. Chiefly Southern US
You. Used in addressing two or more people or referring to two or more people, one of whom is addressed. See Note at y'all, you-uns.

you-all

pron
a US, esp Southern, word for you, used esp when addressing more than one person

you-all

(yuˈɔl, yɔl)

pron. Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S.
(used in direct address to two or more people, or to one person who represents a family, organization, etc.): You-all come back now, hear?
[1815–25, Amer.]
usage: See you.
Translations

you-all

pron (US inf) → ihr
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Love can wreck you-all the more if there was no closure.
And without any horses Buffalo troopers ain't Buffalo troopers no more but pure and simple hired laborers--which, if you ask me, means that for the duration of the war the Emancipation Proclamation's been declared null and void, and you-all so-called Buffalo troopers are going back to being what y'all do best, common ordinary handkerchief-headed ditch diggers and mule-back stevedores, so what you got to say about that?
I promise this: As long as you-all continue reading and writing, so will I.
The] government's clearly entitled to the information that they're seeking, and just because you-all have set up a system that makes that difficult, that doesn't in any way lessen the government's right to receive that information just as they could from any telephone company or any other e-mail source that could provide it easily.
Don't let the short time span of the training session fool you-all the companies interviewed for this article said that they found the process to be an extremely vigorous one that delves into an extensive range of cleaning topics.
In imitation of an American gangster rap video, one of the Tobagans "even try yanking, talking like a Yankee--'How you-all go-eng, bro," but he is quickly laughed down by his friends for the fakeness (28).
And since the darkness that gets us whistling is always the same, the End of the World is really the scariest of all verbs conjugated in the future tense: I will die, you will die, he or she will die, we will die, you-all will die, they will die.
As you-all know, Mr Jabez sang for us on his last tour.
Well, maybe a word: the 1859 edition of these memorable lines (LI) reads thy for your; the 1868 edition in effect enlarges the address from confessional advice into oratorical rhetoric that, invoking the piety, wit, and tears not of an individual but of you-all, seems suited to publishers and presidents alike.
That is why, really, what you-all have been doing over there is so important.
You-all have taken very complex information and made it accessible.