youngster

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young·ster

 (yŭng′stər)
n.
1. A young person; a child or youth.
2. A young animal.

youngster

(ˈjʌŋstə)
n
1. (Sociology) a young person; child or youth
2. (Zoology) a young animal, esp a horse

young•ster

(ˈyʌŋ stər)

n.
1. a child.
2. a young person.
3. a young horse or other animal.
[1580–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.youngster - a young person of either sexyoungster - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
child's body - the body of a human child
juvenile, juvenile person - a young person, not fully developed
bairn - a child: son or daughter
buster - a robust child
changeling - a child secretly exchanged for another in infancy
child prodigy, infant prodigy, wonder child - a prodigy whose talents are recognized at an early age; "Mozart was a child prodigy"
foster child, foster-child, fosterling - a child who is raised by foster parents
scamp, imp, monkey, rapscallion, rascal, scalawag, scallywag - one who is playfully mischievous
kiddy - a young child
orphan - a child who has lost both parents
peanut - a young child who is small for his age
picaninny, piccaninny, pickaninny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Black child
poster child - a child afflicted by some disease or deformity whose picture is used on posters to raise money for charitable purposes; "she was the poster child for muscular dystrophy"
kindergartener, kindergartner, preschooler - a child who attends a preschool or kindergarten
silly - a word used for misbehaving children; "don't be a silly"
sprog - a child
bambino, toddler, yearling, tot - a young child
urchin - poor and often mischievous city child
street child, waif - a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphaned; "street children beg or steal in order to survive"

youngster

noun youth, girl, boy, kid (informal), lad, teenager, juvenile, cub, young person, lass, young adult, pup (informal, chiefly Brit.), urchin, teenybopper (slang), young shaver (informal), young 'un (informal) Other youngsters are not so lucky.

youngster

noun
A young person between birth and puberty:
Informal: kid.
Scots: bairn.
Translations
صَبي، صِبيان
mladík
ungt menneske
gyerkõc
barn, unglingur
mladenič

youngster

[ˈjʌŋstəʳ] Njoven mf

youngster

[ˈjʌŋstər] n (= young person) → jeune mf (= child) → enfant mf

youngster

n (= boy)Junge m; (= child)Kind nt; he’s just a youngsterer ist eben noch jung or ein Kind

youngster

[ˈjʌŋstəʳ] n (child) → bambino/a; (young person) → giovane m/f

young

(jaŋ) adjective
in the first part of life, growth, development etc; not old. a young person; Young babies sleep a great deal; A young cow is called a calf.
noun plural
the group of animals or birds produced by parents. Most animals defend their young.
ˈyoungster noun
a young person. A group of youngsters were playing football.
the young
young people in general.

youngster

n. jovencito-a, muchacho-a.
References in classic literature ?
They liked to prepare rich, hearty food and to see people eat it; to make up soft white beds and to see youngsters asleep in them.
The task of cramming knowledge into these self-sufficient, inefficient youngsters of both sexes discourages me at times.
He was about to enlarge further, but the two youngsters broke into a noisy fit of merriment: my giddy miss being delighted to discover that she might turn his strange talk to matter of amusement.
And he added, under his breath: "Those youngsters with their school-girl airs
Then she would take the straightest of straight lines in his direction, striking out with her fore flippers and knocking the youngsters head over heels right and left.
They were a group of merry youngsters, almost maddened with the exuberant frolicsomeness of their years.
But in my opinion, the most remarkable of this famous company were two sons of the North Wind (airy youngsters, and of rather a blustering disposition) who had wings on their shoulders, and, in case of a calm, could puff out their cheeks, and blow almost as fresh a breeze as their father.
I don't think you've ever been hare-brained and light- hearted, like other youngsters.
In this secluded abode of happiness there were no cross old women, no cruel step-dames, no withered spinsters, no lovesick maidens, no sour old bachelors, no inattentive husbands, no melancholy young men, no blubbering youngsters, and no squalling brats.
She scuttled in like a ghost, and, knowing the senior bees would turn her out at once, dodged into a brood-frame, where youngsters who had not yet seen the winds blow or the flowers nod discussed life.
Wouldn't catch me going crazy over any of my youngsters clear- ing out.
The youngsters, not immediately within sight, seemed rather bright and desirable appurtenances than otherwise; the incidents of daily life were not without humorousness and jollity in their aspect there.