youngster

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young·ster

 (yŭng′stər)
n.
1. A young person; a child or youth.
2. A young animal.

youngster

(ˈjʌŋstə)
n
1. (Sociology) a young person; child or youth
2. (Zoology) a young animal, esp a horse

young•ster

(ˈyʌŋ stər)

n.
1. a child.
2. a young person.
3. a young horse or other animal.
[1580–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.youngster - a young person of either sexyoungster - a young person of either sex; "she writes books for children"; "they're just kids"; "`tiddler' is a British term for youngster"
child's body - the body of a human child
juvenile, juvenile person - a young person, not fully developed
bairn - a child: son or daughter
buster - a robust child
changeling - a child secretly exchanged for another in infancy
child prodigy, infant prodigy, wonder child - a prodigy whose talents are recognized at an early age; "Mozart was a child prodigy"
foster child, foster-child, fosterling - a child who is raised by foster parents
scamp, imp, monkey, rapscallion, rascal, scalawag, scallywag - one who is playfully mischievous
kiddy - a young child
orphan - a child who has lost both parents
peanut - a young child who is small for his age
picaninny, piccaninny, pickaninny - (ethnic slur) offensive term for a Black child
poster child - a child afflicted by some disease or deformity whose picture is used on posters to raise money for charitable purposes; "she was the poster child for muscular dystrophy"
kindergartener, kindergartner, preschooler - a child who attends a preschool or kindergarten
silly - a word used for misbehaving children; "don't be a silly"
sprog - a child
bambino, toddler, yearling, tot - a young child
urchin - poor and often mischievous city child
street child, waif - a homeless child especially one forsaken or orphaned; "street children beg or steal in order to survive"

youngster

noun youth, girl, boy, kid (informal), lad, teenager, juvenile, cub, young person, lass, young adult, pup (informal, chiefly Brit.), urchin, teenybopper (slang), young shaver (informal), young 'un (informal) Other youngsters are not so lucky.

youngster

noun
A young person between birth and puberty:
Informal: kid.
Scots: bairn.
Translations
صَبي، صِبيان
mladík
ungt menneske
gyerkõc
barn, unglingur
mladenič

youngster

[ˈjʌŋstəʳ] Njoven mf

youngster

[ˈjʌŋstər] n (= young person) → jeune mf (= child) → enfant mf

youngster

n (= boy)Junge m; (= child)Kind nt; he’s just a youngsterer ist eben noch jung or ein Kind

youngster

[ˈjʌŋstəʳ] n (child) → bambino/a; (young person) → giovane m/f

young

(jaŋ) adjective
in the first part of life, growth, development etc; not old. a young person; Young babies sleep a great deal; A young cow is called a calf.
noun plural
the group of animals or birds produced by parents. Most animals defend their young.
ˈyoungster noun
a young person. A group of youngsters were playing football.
the young
young people in general.

youngster

n. jovencito-a, muchacho-a.
References in classic literature ?
Once on a time I really imagined myself "an author of fairy tales," but now I am merely an editor or private secretary for a host of youngsters whose ideas I am requestsed to weave into the thread of my stories.
And he added, under his breath: "Those youngsters with their school-girl airs
A crew, a brave crew, all youngsters, all of us, fore and aft, no man was forty, a mad, gay crew.
She scuttled in like a ghost, and, knowing the senior bees would turn her out at once, dodged into a brood-frame, where youngsters who had not yet seen the winds blow or the flowers nod discussed life.
But they quickly left me alone, being replaced by a dozen curious and teasing youngsters.
Some ragged little boys from the depot sold pop and iced lemonade under a white umbrella at the corner, and made faces at the spruce youngsters who came to dance.
There was a time, long ago, when I used to clamour for the hard work: now I like to give the youngsters a chance.
They agreed that the happiest time in their lives was as youngsters in good ships, with no care in the world but not to lose a watch below when at sea and not a moment's time in going ashore after work hours when in harbour.
It's very little kindness for the sixth to meddle generally--you youngsters mind that.
Yes, they are splendid, splendid youngsters," chimed in the count, who always solved questions that seemed to him perplexing by deciding that everything was splendid.
As we shall not see her again, it may be worth mentioning here that all Never birds now build in that shape of nest, with a broad brim on which the youngsters take an airing.
Folklore, legends, myths and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous and manifestly unreal.