zapateado

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za·pa·te·a·do

 (zä′pə-tā-ä′dō, sä′pä-tĕ-)
n. pl. za·pa·te·a·dos
1. The rhythmic stamping and tapping of the heels characteristic of Spanish flamenco dances.
2. A Spanish flamenco dance in which the performer stamps and taps rhythmically with the heels.

[Spanish, from zapatear, to tap with the shoe, from zapato, shoe.]

zapateado

(θapateˈaðo)
n, pl -dos (-ðos)
(Dancing) a Spanish dance with stamping and very fast footwork
[from zapatear to tap with the shoe, from zapato shoe]

za•pa•te•a•do

(ˌzɑ pə tiˈɑ doʊ, -teɪ-, ˌsɑ-)

n., pl. -dos.
a Spanish dance for a solo performer, marked by rhythmic tapping of the heels.
[1885–90; < Sp, n. use of past participle of zapatear to strike with the shoe, tap]
References in periodicals archive ?
Autre instrument ayant attire les regards la Tarima, une estrade a plusieurs ouvertures de diametres differents, servant de caisse de resonance aux quelques Zapateados (danse tres rythmee executee avec les talons) que Violeta Jarero Castillo et Ernesto Cano Martinez ont genereusement offerts au public.
Benitez herself seems to have mellowed, employing fewer of her signature bravura zapateados and more of her expressive tilts of the head and slim-waisted torso and dramatic, sudden gestures.
Most are dance forms, including sets of fourteen contradanzas, seven waltzes, six zapateados, two boleras (see ex.
This collection is important also in that the several notated variations that follow each of the six individual zapateados indicate how this instrumental dance form could have been improvised in live performance.
With the exception of a transcription of Moncayo's famous folk-influenced orchestral concert piece Huapango, the selections are well-known marimba "standards": zapateados and waltzes, with one danzon, "Comitan.
Esther Marion, with her stylish, elongated El Greco body and limbs, curled her arms around her head in a sorrowful Solea and later returned in black pants to dance Bamb Masri with crisp zapateados, strikingly accompanied only by palmas (the rhythmic clapping of hands) and the hypnotic sound of a cajon (a type of wooden box).