zero-hours contract


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zero-hours contract

or

zero-hour contract

n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) an employment contract which does not oblige the employer to provide regular work for the employee, but requires the employee to be on call in the event that work becomes available
References in periodicals archive ?
The main reason people were on a zero-hours contract was because it was the only type of work available to them, research by the TUC found.
1 per cent of people in employment on a zero-hours contract are in the health and social service industry and 10.
The very nature of a zero-hours contract means that any employee making noises about rights, proper hours or how they're treated will simply find they don't get any hours next week.
4% of the workforce in the UK between April and June this year reported that their main job came under a zero-hours contract.
The advert reads: "These roles are offered on a zero-hours contract basis, although the successful candidates will work as required, there is no guarantee of regular hours.
Comments posted on the jobs site Glassdoor revealed the difficulties of working on a zero-hours contract, under which workers do not know from one week to the next how many hours they will be offered.
Angela Allsopp "I'm on a zero-hours contract, it's a nightmare not knowing when you will be working or for how long.
TUC General Secretary Frances O'Grady said: "Whatever you call a zero-hours contract, it's still a recipe for insecurity and exploitation.
A ZERO-hours contract is an employment agreement where you sign up to be available for work as and when your employer requires, meaning you have no guaranteed hours or times of work.
the minister for employment relations and consumer affairs, Jo Swinson said that despite calls for an outright ban of the zero-hours contract, it would be very difficult and does serve a necessary means of flexibility for the employer and employee.
This latest revelation comes after figures were released last month that showed the number of workers on a zero-hours contract in Wales has risen to 42,000 between April and June this year: that's up 5%.
A zero-hours contract may be used for casual work, where the employer can choose from a pool of available workers as and when they are required.