zircon

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zir·con

 (zûr′kŏn′)
n.
A brown to colorless mineral, ZrSiO4, which is heated, cut, and polished to form a brilliant blue-white gem.

[German Zirkon (originally in obsolete scientific German Zirkonerde, zirconium oxide, coined by German chemist Martin Heinrich Klaproth (1743-1817), who first isolated it from a jacinth), probably partly from Arabic zarqūn, minium, bright red (from Persian zargūn, gold-colored, from Middle Persian zargōn, golden : zarr, zar-, golden from Old Iranian *zarna-; see ghel- in Indo-European roots + gōn, color, from Old Iranian *gaona-; akin to Sanskrit guṇaḥ, string, thread, quality), and partly from European terms for "jacinth" such as French jargon (from Old French jargonce, ultimately from Latin hyacinthus; see hyacinth).]

zircon

(ˈzɜːkɒn)
n
(Minerals) a reddish-brown, grey, green, blue, or colourless hard mineral consisting of zirconium silicate in tetragonal crystalline form with hafnium and some rare earths as impurities. It occurs principally in igneous rocks and is an important source of zirconium, zirconia, and hafnia: it is used as a gemstone and a refractory. Formula: ZrSiO4
[C18: from German Zirkon, from French jargon, via Italian and Arabic, from Persian zargūn golden]

zir•con

(ˈzɜr kɒn)

n.
a mineral, zirconium silicate, ZrSiO4, occurring in small tetragonal crystals or grains of various colors, usu. opaque: used as a gem when transparent.
[1785–95; < German Zirkon]

zir·con

(zûr′kŏn′)
A brown, reddish to bluish, gray, green, or colorless mineral that is a silicate of zirconium and occurs in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, and especially in sand. The colorless varieties are valued as gems.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.zircon - a common mineral occurring in small crystals; chief source of zirconium; used as a refractory when opaque and as a gem when transparent
atomic number 40, zirconium, Zr - a lustrous grey strong metallic element resembling titanium; it is used in nuclear reactors as a neutron absorber; it occurs in baddeleyite but is obtained chiefly from zircon
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
hyacinth, jacinth - a red transparent variety of zircon used as a gemstone
jargoon, jargon - a colorless (or pale yellow or smoky) variety of zircon
Translations

zircon

[ˈzɜːkən] Ncircón m

zircon

nZirkon m

zircon

[ˈzɜːkən] nzircone m
References in periodicals archive ?
Hanni and Weibel described heated zircons containing two sets of tiny cleavage fissures, each responsible for a cat's-eye reflection.
Ancient carbon-containing zircons from this period are extremely rare--only around one in 10,000 crystals--so the finding will be difficult to confirm, the researchers note online October 19 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Scientists from Stanford University and the University of California drew this conclusion from tens of thousands of multibillion year-old zircons they obtained in Jack Hills, Australia, the oldest material of terrestrial origin found to date.
Scientists from Stanford University and the University of California, Los Angeles said they recently collected some 10,000 multibillion year-old zircons in Jack Hills, Australia, including one believed to contain a carbon deposit that is 4.
Therefore, we have used a combination of zircon U-Pb CA-ID-TIMS and LA-ICP-MS geochronology to better constrain the age of the granite emplacement and of the inherited zircons.
2014) lately reported for the first time age spectra of detrital zircons from Cambrian and Devonian sandstones and confirmed that the Early Paleozoic siliciclastics clearly reflected the Precambrian basement geology of Baltica.
Zircons are part of the Earth's crust, which is found in igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.
4 billion years ago, building on earlier studies that used lead isotopes to date the Australian zircons and identify them as the oldest bits of the Earth's crust.
Zircons were separated using standard techniques of crushing, grinding, sieving and heavy liquid and magnetic separation at the University of Houston.
The ancient zircons they unearthed are shards of lost Mauritia.
The sample yielded abundant zircons, comprising clear, pale brown, stubby to elongate, square prisms with simple terminations.
Therefore, it was deemed necessary to obtain new geochronologic data using the U-Pb method in zircons.