zoochorous


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zoochorous

(ˌzəʊəˈkɔːrəs)
adj
(Botany) (of a plant) having the spores or seeds dispersed by animals
[from zoo- + -chore + -ous]
ˈzooˌchore n
References in periodicals archive ?
Diaspores were classified according to Van der Pijl (1982) as anemochorous (winged or plumed diaspores), zoochorous (scattered by animals), or autochorous (dispersed by explosion or gravity).
In many zoochorous pollination systems, the benefit of broader pollen dispersal via visitation by more individual pollinators must be weighed against the potential opportunity cost of incomplete pollen removal.
Following Van der Pijl (1982), the syndromes were classified into three groups: (a) zoochorous, when diaspores are dispersed by animals; for example, those with sweet flesh, and seeds with arils; species dispersed by insects, vertebrates and man are included in this group; (b) anemochorous, when the diaspores are adapted to wind dispersal, featuring structures such as feathers and wings; (c) autochorous, when the plants have their own dispersion mechanisms: seeds are either launched on the surrounding areas by any particular mechanism or they are simply released by the plant directly on the ground, or barochoric (gravity) which comprise species with explosive dispersal or dispersal by gravity.
In tropical dry forest an important proportion of the tree flora is anemochorous (wind-dispersed), and their seeds can reach pastures much more easily than those of zoochorous (animal dispersed) tree species.
These variables are clonality (yes, no), pollination model (wind, insects, water), dispersal syndrome (anemochorous, hydrochorous, zoochorous and others that include barochorous, balistochorous, etc.
Available information from several Neotropical regions indicate that during the dry season the number of species with anemochorous or autochorous diaspores is higher, while species with zoochorous diaspores seem to produce them most often in the rainy season (Morellato et al.
Dwarf bamboos affect the regeneration of zoochorous trees by providing habitats to acorn-feeding rodents.
It occurs mainly in Cerrado vegetation, especially in the Chapada do Araripe region, and has primary barochoric and secondary zoochorous dispersion.
33% of data variation and was associated with nontussock hemicriptophytes and zoochorous (FG2) and therophytes I (FG6), dictating the ordering of transects T1 (2007), T2 (2007, 2009, and 2011) and T12 (2011).
A test of the escape and colonization hypothesis for zoochorous tree species in a Western Amazonian forest.
We also applied the Rayleigh test (Zar, 1999) to assess whether the anemochorous, autochorous and zoochorous species fruit uniformly throughout the year.