zygote


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zy·gote

 (zī′gōt′)
n.
1. The cell formed by the union of two gametes, especially a fertilized ovum before cleavage.
2. The organism that develops from a zygote.

[From Greek zugōtos, yoked, from zugoun, to yoke; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

zy·got′ic (-gŏt′ĭk) adj.
zy·got′i·cal·ly adv.

zygote

(ˈzaɪɡəʊt; ˈzɪɡ-)
n
1. (Biology) the cell resulting from the union of an ovum and a spermatozoon
2. (Biology) the organism that develops from such a cell
[C19: from Greek zugōtos yoked, from zugoun to yoke]
zygotic adj
zyˈgotically adv

zy•gote

(ˈzaɪ goʊt, ˈzɪg oʊt)

n.
the cell produced by the union of two gametes, before it undergoes cleavage.
[1885–90; < Greek zygōtós yoked, v. adj. of zygoûn to yoke, join together, derivative of zygón yoke]
zy•got•ic (zaɪˈgɒt ɪk, zɪ-) adj.
zy•got′i•cal•ly, adv.

zy·gote

(zī′gōt′)
The cell formed by the union of the nuclei of two reproductive cells (called gametes), especially a fertilized egg cell.

zygote

1. A fertilized egg cell produced during sexual reproduction.
2. A fertilized egg, formed by the union of a sperm with an ovum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.zygote - (genetics) the diploid cell resulting from the union of a haploid spermatozoon and ovum (including the organism that develops from that cell)
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
cell - (biology) the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms; they may exist as independent units of life (as in monads) or may form colonies or tissues as in higher plants and animals
heterozygote - (genetics) an organism having two different alleles of a particular gene and so giving rise to varying offspring
homozygote - (genetics) an organism having two identical alleles of a particular gene and so breeding true for the particular characteristic
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
Translations
tsygootti
zigota
zigóta

zygote

n (Biol) → Zygote f

zy·gote

n. cigoto, óvulo fertilizado, célula fecundada por la unión de dos gametos.

zygote

n cigoto
References in periodicals archive ?
The dynamic presence of Behrang Samadzadegan in our shop and all the places he has visited is like a fresh and invigorating breeze--and it hits everyone who comes into contact with him," said Executive Director Liz Maugans of Zygote Press, which is part of the Cleveland Foundation.
Both human and mouse embryos develop from a fertilized egg, or zygote, that splits into two cells, then four, eight, 16 and so on.
By using mouse fertilised zygote and mouse developing primordial germ cells we will investigate novel molecular components implicated in the genome-wide erasure of DNA methylation.
The coming into existence of the zygote is the point of conception--the beginning of the life of a new human organism.
As the new blog noted, the company has years of experience in helping people get financing for a variety of IVF treatments, including in vitro fertilization, infertility treatments, zygote intrafallopian transfers, egg freezing and sperm freezing.
Interestingly, this "alignment-of-fitness" requires a "bottleneck" or unicellular stage when the organism consists of just one cell-a spore, zygote, or uninucleate asexual propagule.
A zygote is the very earliest stages of human development: after the sperm has punctured the egg, the half-strands of DNA have merged into a unique human blueprint, and cell multiplication has begun.
The zygote travels the rest of the way down the Fallopian tube towards the uterus, dividing as it makes its journey.
In a test tube, the nucleus of an unfertilized sheep egg was replaced by the nucleus from an adult sheep's mammary gland, and this artificial zygote was then placed into the womb of another sheep, which produced Dolly, who lived for six years.
This is the metamorphosis of the zygote transformed into a full-fledged human being.
Christianity, for all its perceived faults, still offers consistent and solid teaching about the inherent dignity of the human person, at all stages of life, from the tiniest zygote to the frailest elderly person.
Benedict Ashley and Albert Moraczewski, studying Aquinas' embryological principles, maintain that "it is the nucleus of the zygote produced by the fertilization of the human ovum by a human sperm" that is the formal and efficient cause of developing human entity ("Cloning, Aquinas, and the Embryonic Person," National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly, Summer 2001).