ayin

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a·yin

 (ī′ĭn)
n.
The 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. See Table at alphabet.

[Hebrew 'ayin, eye, ayin; see ʕyn in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ayin

(ˈɑːjɪn; Hebrew ˈajiːn)
n
(Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the 16th letter in the Hebrew alphabet (ע), originally a pharyngeal fricative, that is now silent and transliterated by a raised inverted comma (`)
[Hebrew]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•yin

(ˈɑ yɪn, ˈɑ yin)

n.
the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet.
[1875–80; < Hebrew ‘ayin literally, eye]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ayin - the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabetayin - the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet
Hebraic alphabet, Hebrew alphabet, Hebrew script - a Semitic alphabet used since the 5th century BC for writing the Hebrew language (and later for writing Yiddish and Ladino)
alphabetic character, letter of the alphabet, letter - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; "his grandmother taught him his letters"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Andre Lemaire, who first published this latter "stray," concluded the unexpected 'ayin marks the long vowel a, usually indicated by h in final position (e.g., dlh, hmdnh), but not found in medial position ("Les formulaires juridiques des tablettes arameennes," in Trois millenaires de formularies juridiques, ed.
[phrase omitted] All turn into 'ayin,' into nought, into non-being.
However, the word bara is generally understood to be used in the Creation account to denote creatio ex nihilo, creating something from nothing (yesh me 'ayin).