'pon

'pon

(pɒn)
prep
upon
contraction of
upon
References in classic literature ?
''Pon my soul and honour,' said Mr Slum, 'that's a good remark.
''pon my soul and honour I hardly know what I came here for.
'Pon my soul and honour,' said the military gentleman, checking himself and looking round the room, 'what a devilish classical thing this is!
I did, 'pon my word, I got that frightened!" said he, as if bragging of having been frightened.
Joe, I never meant to -- 'pon my soul and honor, I never meant to, Joe.
"'Pon my word," said Conseil, "it will be gingerbread."
"'Pon my word," he said, "I wish we could go off somewhere by ourselves.
"'Pon my soul, I did not know you could forget yourself to that extent." He didn't try to conceal his physical disgust, because he believed it to be a purely moral reprobation of every unreserve, of anything in the nature of a scene.
Now, when I study 'pon it, I think de straight road de best, deridedly."
"'Pon my soul, I don't wonder," said Strickland, with his eyes on the ceiling-cloth.
But 'pon my body, it is a rum life for a married couple!
"Er-bare!" He apologized, though, and said, "'Pon my soul it is aggravating, but I cahn't help it--I have got so used to speaking nothing but French, my dear Erbare--damme there it goes again!--got so used to French pronunciation that I cahn't get rid of it--it is positively annoying, I assure you." This entertaining idiot, whose name was Gordon, allowed himself to be hailed three times in the street before he paid any attention, and then begged a thousand pardons and said he had grown so accustomed to hearing himself addressed as "M'sieu Gor-r-dong," with a roll to the r, that he had forgotten the legitimate sound of his name!