Aeneas

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Ae·ne·as

 (ĭ-nē′əs)
n. Greek & Roman Mythology
The Trojan hero of Virgil's epic poem, the Aeneid, and son of Anchises and Aphrodite. He escaped the sack of Troy and wandered for seven years before settling in Italy.

Aeneas

(ɪˈniːəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a Trojan prince, the son of Anchises and Aphrodite, who escaped the sack of Troy and sailed to Italy via Carthage and Sicily. After seven years, he and his followers established themselves near the site of the future Rome

Ae•ne•as

(ɪˈni əs)

n.
a Trojan hero, the legendary ancestor of the Romans and protagonist of the Aeneid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aeneas - a mythical Greek warrior who was a leader on the Trojan side of the Trojan WarAeneas - a mythical Greek warrior who was a leader on the Trojan side of the Trojan War; hero of the Aeneid
Translations

Aeneas

[iːˈniːəs] NEneas

Aeneas

nÄneas m

Aeneas

[ɪˈniːəs] nEnea m
References in classic literature ?
When Aeneas saw him thus making havoc among the ranks, he went through the fight amid the rain of spears to see if he could find Pandarus.
Sthenelus, son of Capaneus, saw them coming and said to Diomed, "Diomed, son of Tydeus, man after my own heart, I see two heroes speeding towards you, both of them men of might the one a skilful archer, Pandarus son of Lycaon, the other, Aeneas, whose sire is Anchises, while his mother is Venus.
Four are still in his stables, but he gave the other two to Aeneas.
who in his book called the Aeneid told of the wanderings and adventures of Aeneas, and part of this poem Surrey translated into English.
This is how he tells of the way in which Aeneas saved his old father by carrying him on his shoulders out of the burning town of Troy when "The crackling flame was heard throughout the walls, and more and more the burning heat drew near.
27) The name Aeneas is here connected with the epithet AIEOS (awful): similarly the name Odysseus is derived (in "Odyssey" i.
Perhaps Jones might have seen him in that light, and have recollected the passage where the Sibyl, in order to procure an entrance for Aeneas, presents the keeper of the Stygian avenue with such a sop.