-fold


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-fold

suff.
1.
a. Multiplied by a specified number: a twofold increase in sales.
b. Divided by a specified number: a fivefold reduction in air pollution.
2. Having a specified number of parts: a threefold plan for fighting poverty.

[Middle English, from Old English -feald, -fald; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

-fold

suffix forming adjectives, suffix forming adverbs
having so many parts, being so many times as much or as many, or multiplied by so much or so many: threefold; three-hundredfold.
[Old English -fald, -feald]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fold1

(foʊld)

v.t.
1. to bend (cloth, paper, etc.) over upon itself.
2. to bring into a compact form by bending and laying parts together: to fold up a map.
3. to bring together and intertwine or cross: He folded his arms on his chest.
4. to bend or wind; entwine: The child folded his arms around my neck.
5. to bring (the wings) close to the body, as a bird on alighting.
6. to enclose; wrap; envelop: to fold something in paper.
7. to embrace or clasp; enfold: to fold someone in one's arms.
8. to place (one's cards) facedown so as to withdraw from the play.
9. Informal. to bring to an end; close up: to fold a business.
v.i.
10. to be folded or be capable of folding.
11. to place one's cards facedown so as to withdraw from the play.
12.
a. to fail, esp. to go out of business: The magazine folded after a few years.
b. to end a run; close: The show will fold next week.
13. fold in, to blend (a cooking ingredient) into a mixture by gently turning one part over another: Fold in the egg whites.
14. fold out or down, to spread or open up; unfold.
n.
15. a part that is folded; pleat; layer: folds of cloth.
16. a line, crease, or hollow made by folding.
17. a hollow place in undulating ground.
18. a portion of rock strata that is folded or bent, as an anticline or syncline, or that connects horizontal strata, as a monocline.
19. a coil of a serpent, string, etc.
20. the act of folding or doubling over.
21. a margin or ridge formed by the folding of a membrane or other flat body part; plica.
[before 900; Middle English folden, falden, Old English fealdon]
fold′a•ble, adj.

fold2

(foʊld)

n.
1. an enclosure for sheep.
2. the sheep kept within it.
3. a flock of sheep.
4. a church or its members.
5. a group sharing common beliefs, values, etc.: to rejoin the fold.
v.t.
6. to confine (sheep or other domestic animals) in a fold.
[before 900; Middle English fold, fald, Old English fald, falod]

-fold

a combining form meaning “having the number of kinds or parts” or “multiplied the number of times” specified by the initial element: fourfold; manyfold.
[Middle English; Old English -fald, -feald, c. Old Frisian, Old Saxon -fald, Old High German -falt, Old Norse -faldr, Gothic -falths, all representing the Germanic base of fold1; akin to Greek -ploos, -plous (see diplo-), Latin -plus (see double), -plex -plex]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

-fold

[fəʊld] ADJ, ADV (ending in compounds) thirty-fold (as adj) → de treinta veces; (as adv) → treinta veces
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005