-kin


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-kin

or -kins
suff.
Little one: devilkin.

[Middle English, probably from Middle Dutch -kijn, -kin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

-kin

suffix forming nouns
small: lambkin.
[from Middle Dutch, of West Germanic origin; compare German -chen]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

kin

(kɪn)

n.
1. all of a person's relatives; kindred.
2. a relative or kinsman.
3. a group of persons tracing or claiming descent from a common ancestor, or constituting a family, clan, tribe, or race.
4. someone or something of the same or similar kind.
5. family relationship or kinship.
adj.
6. of the same family; related; akin.
7. of the same kind or nature; having affinity.
Idioms:
of kin, related; akin.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English cyn; c. Old Saxon, Old High German kunni, Old Norse kyn, Gothic kuni; akin to Latin genus, Greek génos, Skt jánas. compare gender1]
kin′less, adj.

-kin

a diminutive suffix of nouns: catkin.
[Middle English < Middle Dutch, Middle Low German -ken]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.