-nasty


Also found in: Thesaurus.

-nasty

suff.
Nastic response or change: epinasty.

[Greek nastos, pressed down; see nastic + -y.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

-nasty

n combining form
(Botany) indicating a nastic movement to a certain stimulus: nyctinasty.
[from Greek nastos pressed down, close-pressed]
-nastic adj combining form
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nas•ty

(ˈnæs ti)

adj. -ti•er, -ti•est, adj.
1. disgustingly unclean; filthy.
2. offensive to taste or smell; nauseating.
3. indecent or obscene: a nasty word.
4. highly objectionable or unpleasant.
5. vicious, spiteful, or ugly.
6. bad to deal with or experience: a nasty cut; a nasty accident.
7. Slang. formidable: a nasty pitching arm.
n.
8. a nasty person or thing.
[1350–1400; earlier also naxty, naxte, naskie, Middle English, probably < Old Norse]
nas′ti•ly, adv.
nas′ti•ness, n.

-nasty

a combining form with the meaning “nastic pressure,” of the kind or in the direction specified by the initial element: hyponasty.
[< Greek nast(ós) pressed close (see nastic) + -y3]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.